All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Seeds

A seed is an embryonic gymnosperm and angiosperm plant. Many plant structures commonly referred to as "seeds" are actually dry fruits

Nuts are the one-seeded, hard-shelled fruit of some plants (e.g. hazelnut).

  • Recommended Calcium Intake from Seeds and Fruits

    Recommended intake for adults, in milligrams per day (recommended calcium allowances based on North American and western European data):

    • Adolescents, 10–18 years - 1300 mg / day
    • Females, 19 years to menopause - 1000 mg / day
    • Females, pregnant women (last trimester) - 1200 mg / day
    • Females, lactating women - 1000 mg / day
    • Females, postmenopause - 1300 mg / day
    • Males, 19–65 years - 1000 mg / day
    • Males, 65+ years - 1300 mg / day

    The calcium requirement of an adult is generally recognized to be the intake required tomaintain calcium balance and thereforeskeletal integrity

    Calcium balance is determined by the relationship between calcium intake and calcium absorption and excretion. Relatively small changes in calcium absorption and excretion can neutralize a high intake or compensate for a low one. 

    A positive calcium balance (net calcium retention) is required throughout growth, particularly during the first 2 years of life and during puberty and adolescence. These age groups therefore constitute populations at risk for calcium deficiency, as do pregnant women (especially in the last trimester), lactating women, postmenopausal women, and, possibly, elderly men. 

  • Calcium Rich Fruits and Seeds

    Recommended intake of calcium for adults 19–50 years, in milligrams per day (RDA, recommended dietary allowances based on North American and western European data) is  1000 mga day (1 g).

    Example of calcium plant food sources, fruit and seeds: 

    • Sesame seeds, whole, roasted - 989 mg calcium / 100 g.
    • Chia seeds, dried - 631 mg calcium / 100 g. 
    • Figs, dried - 162 mg calcium / 100 g, ~ 600 g figs for 1000 mg (1 g) calcium
    • Olives, ripe, canned - 94 mg calcium / 100 g.
    • Dates, medjool - 64 mg calcium / 100 g.

  • Studies on Safety of GMO Foods

    Every major international science body in the world has reviewed multiple independent studiesin coming to the consensus conclusion that GMO crops are as safe or safer than conventional or organic foods. But until now, the magnitude of the research on crop biotechnology has never been cataloged.

    In response to what they believed was an information gap, a team of Italian scientists summarized 1783 studies about the safety and environmental impacts of GMO foods.

    The researchers couldn’t find a single credible example demonstrating that GM foods pose any harm to humans or animals.

  • B12 in Fermented Korean Vegan Foods and Seaweeds

    Prevalence of vitamin B12 deficient Korean centenarians on the traditional semi-vegetarian was not higher compared with those from Western nations with animal-oriented foods. Screening of vitamin B12 contents has revealed that some traditional soybean-fermented foods, such as Doenjang and Chunggukjang, also Gochujang, Ganjang (soy sauce), cabbage Kimchi, and seaweeds (laver, sea lettuce, sea tangle, sea mustardcontain considerable amounts of vitamin B12. Soybeans (steamed) and tofu do not contain B12. 

    Laver, dried, seasoned & toasted - 55 -71 mcg in 100 g dry weight

    Sea lettuce, raw  -  85 mcg in 100 g dry weight

  • Toxins in Beans

    Green beans, red kidney beans, and white kidney beans - contain naturally a toxin known as phytohaemagglutinin. Food poisoning caused by this toxin in raw and inadequately-cooked beans has a short onset time (1-3 hours) with symptoms of nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea. However, this toxic substance can be destroyed by soaking and then cooking thoroughly at boiling temperature. Tinned beans which have been subjected to thorough heat-treatment are safe to eat without further cooking.

  • Toxins in Fresh Edible Fruits and Seeds

    Several commercial fruits and vegetables contain small amounts of natural toxins. These natural toxins help protect the plants and create resistance to diseases and certain types of insects. See Secondary Metabolites in Leaves and Stems

    The kernels within the pits of some stone fruits contain a natural toxin cyanogenic glycoside. These fruits include apricots, cherries, peaches, pears, plums and prunes. The flesh of the fruits itself is not toxic. Normally, the presence of cyanogenic glycoside alone is not dangerous. When kernels are chewed cyanogenic glycoside can transform into hydrogen cyanide, poisonous to humans. The lethal dose of cyanide ranges from 0.5 to 3.0 mg per kilogram of body weight. It is not recommended to eat the kernels inside the pits of stone fruits.

    Ackee, akee or achee - Blinghia sapida - is a food staple in many Western Africa, Jamaican and Carribean diets. There are two main varieties, hard and soft ackees, that are available for consumption. Both canned and fresh forms of this fruit are consumed. However, unripe fruit contains natural toxins called hypoglycin that can cause serious health effects. The only part of this fruit that is edible, is the properly harvested and prepared ripe golden flesh around the shiny black seeds. The fruit is poisonous unless ripe and after being opened naturally on the tree.

  • Whole Nuts Reduce Cancer Risk But Not Oils

    Whole nuts - walnuts, pecans, peanuts, almonds - not the oils, may reduce cancer risk - another reason to add some nuts to your diet.

    Try to find uncracked nuts to reduce risk of consuming contaminated food.

  • Green, Blue, Grey Water Footprints and Animal Agriculture

    3 Water footprints:

    Green water footprint is water from precipitation that is stored in the root zone of the soil and evaporated, transpired or incorporated by plants. It is particularly relevant for agricultural, horticultural and forestry products.

    Bluewater footprint is water that has been sourced from surface or groundwater resources and is either evaporated, incorporated into a product or taken from one body of water and returned to another, or returned at a different time.

    Grey water footprint is the amount of fresh water required to assimilate pollutants to meet specific water quality standards. The grey water footprint considers point-source pollution discharged to a freshwater resource directly through a pipe or indirectly through runoff or leaching from the soil, impervious surfaces, or other diffuse sources. 

    Fruits and Legumes vs Meat Green, Blue and Grey Water Footprint Comparison

    Water footprint per ton (m3 / ton) and per unit of nutritional value for fruits, pulses (legumes like beans, peanuts) and bovine meat*:   

    Food

    Green Water 
    footprint per ton
    (m3 / ton)

    Blue Water
    footprint per ton
    (m3 / ton)

    Grey Water
    footprint per ton
    (m3 / ton)

    Total Water

    Calorie

    litre/kcal

    Protein

    litre/g

    Fruits 726 147 89 962 2.09 180
    Legumes 3 180 141 734 4 055 1.19 19
    Meat 14 414 550 451 15 415 10.19 112

    * This table made by the author of the site Fruitarians.net (Lena), based on THE GREEN, BLUE AND GREY WATER FOOTPRINT OF FARM ANIMALS AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS, VOLUME 1: MAIN REPORT, M.M. MEKONNEN, A.Y. HOEKSTRA, DECEMBER 2010, VALUE OF WATER RESEARCH REPORT SERIES NO. 48, the link to PDF is provided on the article page.

    Study Conclusions 

    (UNESCO-IHE, Institute for Water Education, 2010)

    As a general picture we find that animal products have a larger water footprint per ton of product than crop products.

    ... The global average water footprint per ton of crop increases from sugar crops (roughly 200 m3 /ton) and vegetables (~300 m3 /ton) to pulses [legumes] (~4000 m3 /ton) and nuts (~9000 m3 /ton). For animal products, the water footprint increases from milk (~1000 m3 /ton) and egg (~3300 m3 /ton) to beef (~15400 m3 /ton).

    Also when viewed from a caloric standpoint, the water footprint of animal products is larger than for crop products. The average water footprint per calorie for beef is twenty times larger than for cereals and starchy roots.

    ... The water footprint per gram of protein for milk, eggs and chicken meat is about 1.5 times larger than for pulses. For beef, the water footprint per gram of protein is 6 times larger than for pulses.

    ... The general conclusion is that from a freshwater resource perspective, it is more efficient to obtain calories, protein and fat through crop products than animal products. 

    ... A vegetarian diet compared with the average current per capita food intake in the USA can reduce the water footprint of an individual by as much as 58%

  • Nuts Fight Cancer

    Walnuts, pecans, and even peanuts - eat them at least sometimes to reduce your risk of getting cancer. 

    1 Walnut has the antioxidant equivalent to vitamin C in 4 oranges. Watch the video by physician Dr. Michael Greger, M.D.

  • Nuts and Berries in Synergy For Cognition Benefits

    The inclusion of nuts in the diet is associated with a decreased risk of coronary artery disease, hypertension, gallstones, diabetes, cancer, metabolic syndrome, and visceral obesity.

    Frequent consumption of berries seems to be associated with improved cardiovascular and cancer outcomes, improved immune function, and decreased recurrence of urinary tract infections.

    The consumption of nuts and berries is associated with reduction in oxidative damage, inflammation, vascular reactivity, and platelet aggregation, and improvement in immune functions. However, only recently have the effects of nut and berry consumption on the brain, different neural systems, and cognition been studied. There is growing evidence that the synergy and interaction of all of the nutrients and other bioactive components in nuts and berries can have a beneficial effect on the brain and cognition. Regular nut consumption, berry consumption, or both could possibly be used as an adjunctive therapeutic strategy in the treatment and prevention of several neurodegenerative diseases and age-related brain dysfunction.

Jeremy Bentham

The question is not, "Can they reason?" nor, "Can they talk?" but "Can they suffer?” 

Mushrooms

Edible mushrooms are the fleshy and edible fruit bodies of several species of macrofungi - fungi which bear large fruiting structures - that are either harvested wild or cultivated. 

Some mushrooms that are edible for most people can cause allergic reactions in some individuals, and old or improperly stored specimens can cause food poisoning. Deadly poisonous mushrooms that are frequently confused with edible mushrooms and cause fatal poisonings. Mushrooms growing in polluted locations can accumulate toxins (e.g. heavy metals).

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