All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

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  • Spotting Bad Science by Andy Brunning

    Many of us rely on media that publish scientific research to adjust our nutrition. Here is something to remember, when evaluating it.

    Spotting Bad Science by a chemistry teacher from UK, Andy Brunning - 12 points to help you separate the science from the pseudoscience:
    1. SENSATIONALISED HEADLINES
    2. MISINTERPRETED RESULTS
    3. CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
    4. CORRELATION & CAUSATION
    5. UNSUPPORTED CONCLUSIONS
    6. PROBLEMS WITH SAMPLE SIZE
    7. UNREPRESENTATIVE SAMPLES USED
    8. NO CONTROL GROUP USED
    9. NO BLIND TESTING USED
    10. SELECTIVE REPORTING OF DATA
    11. UNREPLICABLE RESULTS
    12. NON-PEER REVIEWED MATERIAL

  • Non-Sweet Fruit Salad

    Non-sweet fruitarian salad - basic, easy, and quick

    Let me tell you how I make a basic non-sweet fruitarian salad, step by step, with 12 pictures.

    This is a very simple recipe. Making this tomato-based salad, you can skip any ingredient, according to your preferences or mood, and still have a decent fairly healthy basic fruitarian or frugan meal. It takes less than 10 minutes to make it if you already have tomatoes and some avocadoes, chips, or greens. The dishes are easy to wash afterwards.

     The ingredients you can usually get in any grocery store, in any season. People who have no interest in following any special diet can enjoy this salad too, as well as all vegetarians - it is vegan. 

Erich Fromm

It is naively assumed that the fact that the majority of people share certain ideas and feelings proves the validity of these ideas and feelings. Nothing could be further from the truth. Consensual validation as such has no bearing on reason or mental health.

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are the sugars, starches and fibers found in fruits, grains, vegetables and milk products, one of the basic food groups.

Sugar is the generalized name for sweet, short-chain, soluble carbohydrates, many of which are used in food. They are composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Simple sugars are called monosaccharides and include glucose (or dextrose), fructose, and galactose. The table sugar most customarily used as food is sucrose - hydrolyses into fructose and glucose in the body. Other disaccharides include maltose and lactose. Longer chains of sugars are called oligosaccharides. 

Starch is a polymeric carbohydrate consisting of a large number of glucose units joined by glycosidic bonds. This polysaccharide is produced by most green plants as an energy store. It is the most common carbohydrate in human diets and is contained in large amounts in staple foods such as potatoes, wheat, maize (corn), rice. Pure starch is a white, tasteless and odorless powder that is insoluble in cold water or alcohol. 

Fiber is consists of non-starch polysaccharides such as arabinoxylans, cellulose, and many other plant components such as resistant starch, resistant dextrins, inulin, lignin, chitins, pectins, beta-glucans, and oligosaccharides, and are derived from plants. Dietary fibers are not digested by gastrointestinal enzymes. Soluble fiber dissolves in water, changes as it goes through the digestive tract, where it is fermented by bacteria, partially into physiologically active byproducts - healthful compounds. Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water and stays intact as it moves through your digestive system, can be prebiotic and metabolically ferment in the large intestine. Dietary fibers can change absorption of other nutrients and chemicals. Some soluble plant fibers can modulate intestinal inflammation and are contrabiotic. Many types of so-called dietary fiber are not actually fibrous.

Fruitarians.net Apple