All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

carbohydrates proteins fats

Macronutrients: carbohydrates, proteins, fats
  • WHO on Protein and Amino Acid Requirements

    Protein Requirement Recommendation

    The requirement indicated by the meta-analysis (a median requirement of 105 mg nitrogen/kg per day or 0.66 g/kg per day of protein) can be accepted as the best estimate of a population average requirement for healthy adults.

    General recommendation

    For adults, the protein requirement per kg body weight is considered to be the same for both sexes, at all ages, and for all body weights within the acceptable range. The value accepted for the safe level of intake is 0.83 g/kg per day, for proteins with a protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score value of 1.0. No safe upper limit has been identified... (p. 242)

    Range Body weight Safe level of protein intake (score 1.0)
    From 40 kg 33 g per day
    To 80 kg 66 gper day
  • Lysine and Leucine in Fruit Safou

    Concentrations of some essential amino acids in fruit safou (Dacryodes edulis), such as lysine and leucine, are comparable to concentrations found in eggs.

  • More Fruits and Vegetables Is Better

    “Eat more fruits and vegetables” is timeless advice that has the backing of a large body of evidence. Vegetables and fruits provide fiber, slowly digested carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals, and numerous phytonutrients that have been associated with protection against cardiovascular disease, aging-related vision loss due to cataract and macular degeneration, and maintenance of bowel function. The connection between vegetables and fruits and cancer is less well established. Although they do not have a blanket anticancer effect, fruits and vegetables may work against specific cancers, including esophageal, stomach, lung, and colorectal cancer. 

    Fruits and vegetables should be consumed in abundance, which means a minimum of five servings a day—and more is better. As few as 1 in 4 persons in the United States meet this guideline.

    Patrick J. Skerrett, MA, Walter C. Willett

  • Lean Meat is Not Pure Protein

    "Lean meat" is a misleading term. I noticed many times in conversations that people who think that they eat "proteins" tend to think about this food group as an almost pure protein, a perfect set of essential amino acids. Especially if they consume so called "lean meats." 

    In beef (presented as "90% lean meat") - half of the calories are from fat (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/beef-products/6193/2). Even in the leanest bird meat approximately the fifth of the energy is from fat, ~18% in the leanest I could find (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/poultry-products/704/2).

    Digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of protein in beef is only 0.92, chicken - 0.91(?), and egg whites and soy - 1 or 100% (not that it matters much). Note, that 62% of calories in a whole egg are from fat, and 40% in soybeans. 

  • Sugars Can Be Turned into Fat

    When we are eating excess amounts of carbohydrates (sugars), liver converts the carbon compounds from sugar into fatty acid, and then fat.

    If we continue to consume too much of sugars, complex or simple, and to accumulate fat, especially in the waist area, we can develop insulin resistance.

  • High-Fat Diets and Obecity

    High-fat diets and low physical activity levels may accentuate the susceptibility to obesity by the FTO variant. The fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) has been shown to be associated with obesity and to influence appetite regulation.

Isaac Bashevis Singer

When a human kills an animal for food, he is neglecting his own hunger for justice. Man prays for mercy, but is unwilling to extend it to others. 

Protein Deficiency

Protein deficiency rarely occurs as an isolated condition. It usually accompanies a deficiency of dietary energy and other nutrients resulting from insufficient food intake.

Deficiency of this severity is very rare in the United States, except as a consequence of pathologic conditions.

The symptoms are most commonly seen in deprived children in poor countries:

  • stunting,
  • poor musculature,
  • edema,
  • thin and fragile hair,
  • skin lesions
  • hormonal imbalances.

Edema and loss of muscle mass and hair are the prominent signs in adults. 

Fruitarians.net Apple