All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Fruitarian Future

Visions and possibilities of fruitarian future, higher fruit consumption by humans, environmental protection, reduction of suffering.

Notes: current

It has been seven years since I tried to find researches or philosophers who might be interested in fruitarianism. Back then I have joined ResearchGate.net but nobody seemed to be involved into anything close to fruitarian diet or ethics. I left this note on my profile (researchgate.net/profile/Lena_Nechet):

Hi, I have joined this site for scientist (not being one myself) to find someone who is interested in researching nutritional aspect of fruitarianism. I hoped someone would be interested in a case study. I gave up, maybe too early. I'll keep this profile for the history, without participation, but you are welcome to contact me directly - thank you!

I am not as eager anymore to offer my time for this purpose, but I will definitely consider serious offers.

Franz Kafka

Now I can look at you in peace; I don't eat you any more.

Food Energy

Food energy is chemical energy that animals derive from their food and molecular oxygen through the process of cellular respiration. Humans and other animals need a minimum intake of food energy to sustain their metabolism and to drive their muscles.

Organisms derive food energy from carbohydrates, fats and proteins as well as from organic acids, polyols, and ethanol present in the diet. Some diet components that provide little or no food energy, such as water, minerals, vitamins, cholesterol, and fiber, may still be necessary to health and survival for other reasons. 

Using the International System of Units, researchers measure energy in joules (J) or in its multiples; the kilojoule (kJ) is most often used for food-related quantities. An older metric system unit of energy, still widely used in food-related contexts, is the "food calorie" or kilocalorie (kcal or Cal), equal to 4.184 kilojoules. 

<>Fats and ethanol have the greatest amount of food energy per mass, 37 and 29 kJ/g (8.8 and 6.9 kcal/g), respectively. Proteins and most carbohydrates have about 17 kJ/g (4.1 kcal/g). 

Conventional food energy is based on heats of combustion in a bomb calorimeter and corrections that take into consideration the efficiency of digestion and absorption and the production of urine. 

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