All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Environment

The natural world as affected by human activity, the surroundings or conditions in which a people, animals, or plants live, habitat.

  • GMOs Are Not More Risky

    Europe: Biotechnology and GMOs are not per se more risky than e.g. conventional plant breeding technologies - a conclusion to be drawn from the efforts of more than 130 research projects in 25 years.

  • Love Emails to Trees

    People wrote thousands of love emails to trees

    The city of Melbourne assigned trees email addresses so citizens could report problems. Instead, people wrote thousands of love letters to their favorite trees.

    To: Golden Elm, Tree ID 1037148, 21 May 2015: 

    I'm so sorry you're going to die soon. It makes me sad when trucks damage your low hanging branches. 

    To: Algerian Oak, Tree ID 1032705, 2 February 2015: 

    Thank you for giving us oxygen. Thank you for being so pretty.

    To: Green Leaf Elm, Tree ID 1022165, 29 May 2015: 

    I don't think that there is much more to talk about as we don't have a lot in common, you being a tree and such. But I'm glad we're in this together.

    To: Willow Leaf Peppermint, Tree ID 1357982, 29 January 2015: 

    Do trees have genders? I hope you've had some nice sun today.

  • Forests

    A forest is a large area dominated by trees. Forests are the dominant terrestrial ecosystem of Earth, cover approximately 30% of the world's land, and contain 80% of the plant biomass.

  • Protists

    Protists - members of an informal grouping of diverse eukaryotic organisms that are not animals, plants or fungi, and are grouped together for convenience, like algae or invertebrates. Besides their relatively simple levels of organization, protists do not necessarily have much in common. 

    Subdivisions of Protists

    Protozoa the unicellular "animal-like" - Flagellata, Ciliophora, Amoeba, Sporozoans.

    Protophyta the "plant-like" - mostly unicellular algae.

    Molds the "fungus-like" - slime molds and water molds.

  • Bacteria and Archaea

    Archaea and bacteria (eubacteria) are single-celled organisms that do not have a nucleus or organelles. Archaea have a distinct evolutionary history and biochemistry compared with bacteria.

    Archaea - a domain of single-celled microorganisms. These microbes are prokaryotes. Archaea can survive in extreme and harsh environments like hot springs, salt lakes, marshlands, oceans, gut of ruminants and humans.

    Bacteria - a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms. Typically a few micrometres in length, bacteria have a number of shapes, ranging from spheres to rods and spirals. Eubacteria are ubiquitous and are found in soil, hot springs, radioactive waste water, Earth's crust, organic matter, bodies of plants and animals, etc.

  • Genetically Modified Organisms, GMO

    genetically modified organism (GMO) is any organism whose genetic material has been altered using genetic engineering techniques (i.e., a genetically engineered organism). GMOs are used to produce medications and genetically modified foods, and are widely used in scientific research and the production of other goods. 

    A more specifically defined type of GMO is a "transgenic organism." This is an organism whose genetic makeup has been altered by the addition of genetic material from an unrelated organism. Typically GMOs are organisms whose genetic makeup has been altered without the addition of genetic material from an unrelated organism.

  • Fungi

    fungus is any member of the group of eukaryotic organisms that includes unicellular microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as multicellular fungi that produce familiar fruiting forms known as mushrooms. These organisms are classified as a kingdom Fungi, which is separate from the other eukaryotic life kingdoms of plants and animals. Fungi do not use photosynthesis to create energy.

  • Animals

    Animals are multicellular, eukaryotic organisms of the kingdom Animalia (or Metazoa).All animals can move spontaneously and independently at some point in their lives. Their body plan eventually becomes fixed as they develop, although some undergo a process of metamorphosis later on in their lives. All animals are heterotrophs: they must ingest other organisms or their products for sustenance.

  • Veganism

    Veganism is the practice of abstaining from the use of animal products, particularly in diet, and an associated rejection of the commodity status of animals. A follower of either the diet or the philosophy is known as a vegan.

    Dietary vegans refrain from eating animal products, not only meat but also egg and dairy products and other animal-derived products. The term "ethical vegan" is often applied to those who extend the philosophy beyond diet into other areas of their lives. Environmental veganism refers to avoiding animal products on the premise that harvesting or industrial farming of animals is environmentally damaging and unsustainable.

    The term vegan was coined in 1944 by Donald Watson when he co-founded the Vegan Society in England. At first this meant "non-dairy vegetarian" and later that one "should live without exploiting animals". 

  • Plants Have Many Genes

    Annotation of the first few complete plant genomes has revealed that plants have many genes. For Arabidopsis, over 26,500 gene loci have been predicted, whereas for rice, the number adds up to 41,000. Recent analysis of the poplar genome suggests more than 45,000 genes... 

    One explanation for the large increase in gene number during angiosperm evolution is gene duplication. It has been shown previously that the retention of duplicates following small- and large-scale duplication events in plants is substantial. Taking into account the function of genes that have been duplicated, we are now beginning to understand why many plant genes might have been retained, and how their retention might be linked to the typical lifestyle of plants.

Isaac Bashevis Singer

When a human kills an animal for food, he is neglecting his own hunger for justice. Man prays for mercy, but is unwilling to extend it to others. 

Amino Acids

Protein plays a crucial role in almost all biological processes and amino acids are the building blocks of it.

A large proportion of our cells, muscles and tissue is made up of amino acids - 20% Of the human body is made up of protein. 

~500 Amino acids are known, 20 appear in the genetic code, 9 are essential for humans because they cannot be created from other compounds by the human body, and must be taken from food.

Amino acids carry out many important bodily functions: 

  • give cells their structure;
  • play a key role in the transport and the storage of nutrients;
  • have an influence on the function of organs, glands, tendons and arteries;
  • essential for healing wounds and repairing tissue; 
  • important removal of waste deposits.

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