All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Environment

The natural world as affected by human activity, the surroundings or conditions in which a people, animals, or plants live, habitat.

  • Bacteria and Archaea

    Archaea and bacteria (eubacteria) are single-celled organisms that do not have a nucleus or organelles. Archaea have a distinct evolutionary history and biochemistry compared with bacteria.

    Archaea - a domain of single-celled microorganisms. These microbes are prokaryotes. Archaea can survive in extreme and harsh environments like hot springs, salt lakes, marshlands, oceans, gut of ruminants and humans.

    Bacteria - a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms. Typically a few micrometres in length, bacteria have a number of shapes, ranging from spheres to rods and spirals. Eubacteria are ubiquitous and are found in soil, hot springs, radioactive waste water, Earth's crust, organic matter, bodies of plants and animals, etc.

  • Genetically Modified Organisms, GMO

    genetically modified organism (GMO) is any organism whose genetic material has been altered using genetic engineering techniques (i.e., a genetically engineered organism). GMOs are used to produce medications and genetically modified foods, and are widely used in scientific research and the production of other goods. 

    A more specifically defined type of GMO is a "transgenic organism." This is an organism whose genetic makeup has been altered by the addition of genetic material from an unrelated organism. Typically GMOs are organisms whose genetic makeup has been altered without the addition of genetic material from an unrelated organism.

  • Fungi

    fungus is any member of the group of eukaryotic organisms that includes unicellular microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as multicellular fungi that produce familiar fruiting forms known as mushrooms. These organisms are classified as a kingdom Fungi, which is separate from the other eukaryotic life kingdoms of plants and animals. Fungi do not use photosynthesis to create energy.

  • Animals

    Animals are multicellular, eukaryotic organisms of the kingdom Animalia (or Metazoa).All animals can move spontaneously and independently at some point in their lives. Their body plan eventually becomes fixed as they develop, although some undergo a process of metamorphosis later on in their lives. All animals are heterotrophs: they must ingest other organisms or their products for sustenance.

  • Veganism

    Veganism is the practice of abstaining from the use of animal products, particularly in diet, and an associated rejection of the commodity status of animals. A follower of either the diet or the philosophy is known as a vegan.

    Dietary vegans refrain from eating animal products, not only meat but also egg and dairy products and other animal-derived products. The term "ethical vegan" is often applied to those who extend the philosophy beyond diet into other areas of their lives. Environmental veganism refers to avoiding animal products on the premise that harvesting or industrial farming of animals is environmentally damaging and unsustainable.

    The term vegan was coined in 1944 by Donald Watson when he co-founded the Vegan Society in England. At first this meant "non-dairy vegetarian" and later that one "should live without exploiting animals". 

  • Plants Have Many Genes

    Annotation of the first few complete plant genomes has revealed that plants have many genes. For Arabidopsis, over 26,500 gene loci have been predicted, whereas for rice, the number adds up to 41,000. Recent analysis of the poplar genome suggests more than 45,000 genes... 

    One explanation for the large increase in gene number during angiosperm evolution is gene duplication. It has been shown previously that the retention of duplicates following small- and large-scale duplication events in plants is substantial. Taking into account the function of genes that have been duplicated, we are now beginning to understand why many plant genes might have been retained, and how their retention might be linked to the typical lifestyle of plants.

  • Marine Animals Populations Half in 40 Years since 1970

    A study of marine mammals, birds, reptiles and fish shows a decline of 49% in the size of marine populations between 1970 and 2012.

  • Red Inside Nutrient Rich Apples

    Redlove or Bloody Ploughman were bred from wild apples in their original home in Kazakhstan – many of these varieties are under threat due to forest clearance, showing how vital conservation work is for the future of our food. These apple trees have pink blossom. These apples are red inside and can contain up to twice the polyphenols and five times the healthy anthocyanins of regular light-fleshed apples.

    Once established, apples are one of the easiest fruits to grow, capable of kicking out decades of harvests for the 30 minutes it takes to plant one. Pick a sunny site with well-drained soil and make sure you keep plants evenly watered for their first year or so of growth. After that they will largely look after themselves.

  • Plants Are Susceptible to Cancer, Less Vulnerable to its Effects

    In animals, a tumor develops when a cell (or group of cells) loses the built-in controls that regulate its growth, often as a result of mutations. Plants can experience the same phenomenon, along with cancerous masses, but it tends to be brought on via infection. Fungi, bacteria, viruses, and insect infestation have all been tied to plant cancers. Oak trees, for example, often grow tumors that double as homes for larvae.

    The good news for plants is that even though they’re susceptible to cancer, they’re less vulnerable to its effects. For one thing, a vegetable tumor won’t metastasize. That’s because plant cells are typically locked in place by a matrix of rigid cell walls, so they can’t migrate. Even when a plant cell begins dividing uncontrollably, the tumor it creates remains stuck in one place usually with minor effects on the plant’s health—like a burl in a redwood tree.

    Plants also have the benefit of lacking any vital organs.

    Elliot Meyerowitz, a plant geneticist at the California Institute of Technology:

    “It’s bad to get a brain tumor if you’re a human, but there’s nothing that you can name that’s bad to get a tumor in if you’re a plant. Because whatever it is, you can make another.”

  • Meat Diet and Global Warming

    A typical meat-eater’s diet is responsible for almost twice as much global warming as vegetarian’s and almost triple that of a vegan. The Oxford University study suggested that cutting your meat intake in half could cut your carbon footprint by more than 35%.

Jeremy Bentham

The question is not, "Can they reason?" nor, "Can they talk?" but "Can they suffer?” 

Amino Acids

Protein plays a crucial role in almost all biological processes and amino acids are the building blocks of it.

A large proportion of our cells, muscles and tissue is made up of amino acids - 20% Of the human body is made up of protein. 

~500 Amino acids are known, 20 appear in the genetic code, 9 are essential for humans because they cannot be created from other compounds by the human body, and must be taken from food.

Amino acids carry out many important bodily functions: 

  • give cells their structure;
  • play a key role in the transport and the storage of nutrients;
  • have an influence on the function of organs, glands, tendons and arteries;
  • essential for healing wounds and repairing tissue; 
  • important removal of waste deposits.

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