All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Vegetarian

Vegetarian diet excludes meat (red meat, poultry, seafood, and the flesh of any other animal).

  • Veganism

    Veganism is the practice of abstaining from the use of animal products, particularly in diet, and an associated rejection of the commodity status of animals. A follower of either the diet or the philosophy is known as a vegan.

    Dietary vegans refrain from eating animal products, not only meat but also egg and dairy products and other animal-derived products. The term "ethical vegan" is often applied to those who extend the philosophy beyond diet into other areas of their lives. Environmental veganism refers to avoiding animal products on the premise that harvesting or industrial farming of animals is environmentally damaging and unsustainable.

    The term vegan was coined in 1944 by Donald Watson when he co-founded the Vegan Society in England. At first this meant "non-dairy vegetarian" and later that one "should live without exploiting animals". 

  • Meat Diet and Global Warming

    A typical meat-eater’s diet is responsible for almost twice as much global warming as vegetarian’s and almost triple that of a vegan. The Oxford University study suggested that cutting your meat intake in half could cut your carbon footprint by more than 35%.

  • Vegan Diet Can Lower Risk of Cancer

    Vegan diet seems to confer lower risk for overall and female-specific cancer than other diets.

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Dietary factors account for at least 30% of all cancers in Western countries. 

  • Do Fruitarians Eat Only Sweet Fruits?

    Fruitarian diet is fruit and seeds based, and may include other foods, and not only plants (e.g. algae, mushrooms) - to answer a few recent questions at once.

    Please, do not assume that fruitarianism is eating sweet fruit only. There are many kinds of fruitarians. From those who avoid seeds, if they can, to those who consider honey and eggs to be ethical choices, depending on the circumstances. Usually, fresh fruits are preferable, but the proportion of cooked foods varies. Some fruitarians soak or sprout seeds, some not. Some eat more greens or root/stem vegetables, others prefer botanical fruit, including non-sweet kinds (like tomatoes, cucumbers, squash).

    Most fruitarians have ethical or environmental concerns, some may not, health or performance may be their primary motivation. There are frugans, seasonal fruitarians, freegans, raw vegans or vegetarians with high fruit intake, and so on. Everybody is welcome here :)

    There is no ideal food or method, there is no competition for higher ethics or better health. The idea is to present this topic to more people for an ongoing public discussion and to share knowledge and experience.

  • American Dietetic Association on Vegetarian Diets

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence, and for athletes.

    ...The results of an evidence-based review showed that a vegetarian diet is associated with a lower risk of death from ischemic heart disease. Vegetarians also appear to have lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and lower rates of hypertension and type 2 diabetes than nonvegetarians. Furthermore, vegetarians tend to have a lower body mass index and lower overall cancer rates. Features of a vegetarian diet that may reduce risk of chronic disease include lower intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol and higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, soy products, fiber, and phytochemicals. The variability of dietary practices among vegetarians makes individual assessment of dietary adequacy essential. In addition to assessing dietary adequacy, food and nutrition professionals can also play key roles in educating vegetarians about sources of specific nutrients, food purchase and preparation, and dietary modifications to meet their needs.

  • Plant-Based for Longevity and Against Global Warming

    It was estimated that changes towards more plant-based diets in line with the WHO’s global dietary guidelines could reduce global mortality by 6-10%. Food-related greenhouse gas emissions would be cut by more than two thirds.

  • Lean Meat is Not Pure Protein

    "Lean meat" is a misleading term. I noticed many times in conversations that people who think that they eat "proteins" tend to think about this food group as an almost pure protein, a perfect set of essential amino acids. Especially if they consume so called "lean meats." 

    In beef (presented as "90% lean meat") - half of the calories are from fat (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/beef-products/6193/2). Even in the leanest bird meat approximately the fifth of the energy is from fat, ~18% in the leanest I could find (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/poultry-products/704/2).

    Digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of protein in beef is only 0.92, chicken - 0.91(?), and egg whites and soy - 1 or 100% (not that it matters much). Note, that 62% of calories in a whole egg are from fat, and 40% in soybeans. 

  • Vegans in Britain Tripled in Ten Years

    The number of vegans in Britain has risen by 360% in 10 years. Vegans in the UK are typically city dwellers, aged between 15-34 and motivated by ethical and compassionate reasons.

    World tennis No.1 Novak Djokovic credits a vegan diet with transforming his health and fitness levels and last month opened a vegan restaurant in Monte Carlo. 

  • Non-Sweet Fruit Salad

    Non-sweet fruitarian salad - basic, easy, and quick

    Let me tell you how I make a basic non-sweet fruitarian salad, step by step, with 12 pictures.

    This is a very simple recipe. Making this tomato-based salad, you can skip any ingredient, according to your preferences or mood, and still have a decent fairly healthy basic fruitarian or frugan meal. It takes less than 10 minutes to make it if you already have tomatoes and some avocadoes, chips, or greens. The dishes are easy to wash afterwards.

     The ingredients you can usually get in any grocery store, in any season. People who have no interest in following any special diet can enjoy this salad too, as well as all vegetarians - it is vegan. 

  • Defining Fruitarianism

    I was adjusting my definition of fruitarianism for 20 years, periodically changing it after reflecting on what I learned and experienced. You can read it on the top of the page, and the current version is this: 

    Fruitarianism - a quest for optimal ethical ways to live and diets based on fruits and seeds. 

    This is the line I just attempted to add to the definition of fruitarianism on the Wikipedia page
    "Fruitarianism can also be viewed as a set of ethical values, including respecting lives of plants, and their implementation in lifestyle." But I could not find eligible resources to cite.

    Wiki is the most popular resource online, and the article dedicated to fruitarianism requires some explanation for most people who are new to the term. In this article, I will also give my personal perspective of a practicing skeptic fruitarian.

Jeremy Bentham

The question is not, "Can they reason?" nor, "Can they talk?" but "Can they suffer?” 

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are the sugars, starches and fibers found in fruits, grains, vegetables and milk products, one of the basic food groups.

Sugar is the generalized name for sweet, short-chain, soluble carbohydrates, many of which are used in food. They are composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Simple sugars are called monosaccharides and include glucose (or dextrose), fructose, and galactose. The table sugar most customarily used as food is sucrose - hydrolyses into fructose and glucose in the body. Other disaccharides include maltose and lactose. Longer chains of sugars are called oligosaccharides. 

Starch is a polymeric carbohydrate consisting of a large number of glucose units joined by glycosidic bonds. This polysaccharide is produced by most green plants as an energy store. It is the most common carbohydrate in human diets and is contained in large amounts in staple foods such as potatoes, wheat, maize (corn), rice. Pure starch is a white, tasteless and odorless powder that is insoluble in cold water or alcohol. 

Fiber is consists of non-starch polysaccharides such as arabinoxylans, cellulose, and many other plant components such as resistant starch, resistant dextrins, inulin, lignin, chitins, pectins, beta-glucans, and oligosaccharides, and are derived from plants. Dietary fibers are not digested by gastrointestinal enzymes. Soluble fiber dissolves in water, changes as it goes through the digestive tract, where it is fermented by bacteria, partially into physiologically active byproducts - healthful compounds. Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water and stays intact as it moves through your digestive system, can be prebiotic and metabolically ferment in the large intestine. Dietary fibers can change absorption of other nutrients and chemicals. Some soluble plant fibers can modulate intestinal inflammation and are contrabiotic. Many types of so-called dietary fiber are not actually fibrous.

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