All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Vegetarian

Vegetarian diet excludes meat (red meat, poultry, seafood, and the flesh of any other animal).

  • Protection with Vegetarian and Vegan Diets

    Vegetarians, those who avoid meat, represent 5% of the US population, and vegans, additionally avoiding dairy and eggs, 2%.

    Vegetarian diets confer protection against

    • cardiovascular diseases,
    • cardiometabolic risk factors,
    • some cancers, 
    • total mortality.

    Compared to lacto-ovo-vegetarian diets, vegan diets seem to offer additional protection for

    • obesity,
    • hypertension,
    • type-2 diabetes, 
    • cardiovascular mortality.

    Males experience greater health benefits than females. 

  • Richard Dawkins

    I'd like everybody to be a vegetarian... In 100 or 200 years time, we may look back on the way we treated animals today as something like we today look back on the way our forefathers treated slaves.

  • Fruitarians Are Not Alike

    In a long discussion on youtube that started with my comment (it  was later deleted), in which I was objecting some points the author of the video made, on one point I responded to another person, who asked me about fruitarianism after I mentioned it:

    The one thing I should to tell you here is that fruitarians are not all alike, there are not many of them (us) but they all have their unique set of reasons to follow this lifestyle. For example, my reasons developed from ethical, aesthetic and habitual considerations, many fruitarians are religiously driven (I am a lifelong atheist myself), many think that raw food is the answer to all health challenges and eat lots of fruit as a part of the diet (I am not a raw-foodie), some do not even consume seeds, and subset of this group believe that seeds are just like babies; some eat leaves, some don't, not all fruitarians are vegans, etc. The only thing I found similar among all fruitarians I know, is that the biggest part of their diet (~75%) is fruit, usually fresh, and there are some studies already made that could be used in support of such choice. 

    I hope it gives you some idea about the absence of uniformity in fruitarianism, and why discussing it here is not preferable. Also, I am obviously not able to speak neither for all fruitarians, nor for all vegans.

  • Fruitarian Food Sources of Zinc

    I composed two lists with a few examples of the fruitarian food sources of zinc: fruits, seeds, seaweeds and mushrooms. You can compare the amounts of zinc in them with the recommended daily allowance of the mineral. RDA is usually around 20% higher than the amount needed for half of the healthy people. 

  • Response to Liberation Pledge

    I learned about this DxE pledge on the great channel ModVegan, and commented: 

    Margaret, this is the first time I hear about this Liberation Pledge (thank you), and I am completely against it.

    Positive pear-pressure? They are calling for acts of public disrespect to the participants' closest people! The first result will be alienation of these people from their loved ones, colleagues, and clients, and in deep personal problems.

    Your alternative is much better, but every vegan would act this way in most situations anyway. I am a long-term vegan, BTW. 

  • Carnitine and Microflora

    Intestinal microbiota may contribute to the well-established link between high levels of red meat consumption and cardiovascular disease risk. 

    The study tested the carnitine and trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) levels - a metabolite the researchers previously linked in a 2011 study to the promotion of atherosclerosis in humans - of omnivores, vegans and vegetarians, and examined the clinical data of 2,595 patients undergoing elective cardiac evaluations. The research finds that a diet high in carnitine promotes the growth of the bacteria that metabolize carnitine, compounding the problem by producing even more of the artery-clogging TMAO. 

    Stanley Hazen, M.D., Ph.D.:

    Carnitine metabolism suggests a new way to help explain why a diet rich in red meat promotes atherosclerosis.

    The bacteria living in our digestive tracts are dictated by our long-term dietary patterns. A diet high in carnitine actually shifts our gut microbe composition to those that like carnitine, making meat eaters even more susceptible to forming TMAO and its artery-clogging effects. Meanwhile, vegans and vegetarians have a significantly reduced capacity to synthesize TMAO from carnitine, which may explain the cardiovascular health benefits of these diets.

    Carnitine is naturally occurring in red meats, including beef, venison, lamb, mutton, duck, and pork. It is also a dietary supplement available in pill form and a common ingredient in energy drinks

  • Satisfying Fruitarian Food Days

    Here are two examples of two random satisfying days of vegan fruitarian food for one female and one male persons.

    How is your "perfect" day of food looks like? 

    Yesterday was one of mine (Fruitarian Lena):

    • two glasses of freshly made organic orange juice,
    • a great smoothie with strawberries, purple grapes, bananas and oranges,
    • ~50 g of organic raw zucchini chips (with sesame and sunflower seeds),
    • a few dehydrated tomatoes,
    • tried 4-5 pea sprouts for the first time,
    • a big bowl of organic blueberries and blackberries,
    • a pound pack (1/2 kg) of very ripe dark red organic strawberries!
  • Nori and Chlorella for B12

    A nutritional analysis for the dietary food intake and serum vitamin B12 (cobalamin) level of a group of 6 vegan children aged 7 to 14 who had been living on a vegan diet for 4 to 10 years suggests that consumption of nori may keep vegans from suffering vitamin B12 deficiency.

    Rauma et al. also reported that vegans consuming nori and/or chlorella had a serum vitamin B12 concentration twice as high as those not consuming these algae.

  • Vegetarian Diets and Health

    Vegetarian diets do not contain meat, poultry or fish, vegan diets further exclude dairy products and eggs. Vegetarian and vegan diets can vary widely.

    In general, vegetarian diets provide relatively large amounts of cereals, pulses, nuts, fruits and vegetables.

    In terms of nutrients, vegetarian diets are usually

    • rich in carbohydrates, n-6 fatty acids, dietary fibre, carotenoids, folic acid, vitamin C, vitamin E and Mg,
    • relatively low in protein, saturated fat, long-chain n-3 fatty acids, retinol, vitamin B12, zinc (Zn),
    • vegans may have particularly low intakes of vitamin B12 and low intakes of Ca.

    On average, vegetarians and vegans have a relatively low BMI and a low plasma cholesterol concentration, but higher plasma homocysteine concentrations than in non-vegetarians. Overall, the data suggest that the health of Western vegetarians is good and similar to that of comparable non-vegetarians.

  • Vegetarian Diets and Heart Disease

    In comparison with regular meat eaters, mortality from ischemic heart disease was

    • 20% lower in occasional meat eaters,
    • 34% lower in people who ate fish but not meat,
    • 34% lower in lacto-ovo-vegetarians,
    • 26% lower in vegans.

    There were no significant differences between vegetarians and non-vegetarians in mortality from the other causes of death examined.

Linus Pauling

I have something that I call my Golden Rule. It goes something like this: 'Do unto others twenty-five percent better than you expect them to do unto you.' … The twenty-five percent is for error.

Choline Recommended Intake from Seeds and Fruits

Choline is an essential vitamin-like (vitamin B4) nutrient, synthesized in human body, but not sufficiently.

The recommended adequate intake (AI) of choline is set at 425 milligrams (mg)/day for women and 550 mg/day for men.

Choline deficiency causes muscle damage and abnormal deposition of fat in the liver, which results in a condition called nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Genetic predispositions and gender can influence individual variation in choline requirements.

Example Plant Fruitarian Sources of Choline

Seeds (including legumes and nuts), high in choline, milligrams per 100 g portion: 

  • Soybeans - 124 mg 
  • Lima beans - 97 mg 
  • Lentils - 96 mg
  • Peas (mature) - 96 mg
  • Flaxseeds - 79 mg 
  • Pistachio nuts - 71 mg 
  • Quinoa - 70 mg 
  • Pumpkin and squash seed kernels (pepitas) -  63 mg 
  • Cashew nuts - 61 mg 
  • Pine nuts - 56 mg 
  • Sunflower seed kernels - 55 mg 
  • Buckwheat - 54 mg 
  • Almonds - 52 mg 

Fruits, high in choline, milligrams per 100 g portion: 

  • Tomatoes, sun-dried - 105 mg 
  • Apples - 18 mg 
  • Figs - 16 mg 
  • Avocados - 14 mg 

Fruitarians.net Apple