All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Vegetarian

Vegetarian diet excludes meat (red meat, poultry, seafood, and the flesh of any other animal).

  • Fruitarian Food Sources of Zinc

    I composed two lists with a few examples of the fruitarian food sources of zinc: fruits, seeds, seaweeds and mushrooms. You can compare the amounts of zinc in them with the recommended daily allowance of the mineral. RDA is usually around 20% higher than the amount needed for half of the healthy people. 

  • Response to Liberation Pledge

    I learned about this DxE pledge on the great channel ModVegan, and commented: 

    Margaret, this is the first time I hear about this Liberation Pledge (thank you), and I am completely against it.

    Positive pear-pressure? They are calling for acts of public disrespect to the participants' closest people! The first result will be alienation of these people from their loved ones, colleagues, and clients, and in deep personal problems.

    Your alternative is much better, but every vegan would act this way in most situations anyway. I am a long-term vegan, BTW. 

  • Carnitine and Microflora

    Intestinal microbiota may contribute to the well-established link between high levels of red meat consumption and cardiovascular disease risk. 

    The study tested the carnitine and trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) levels - a metabolite the researchers previously linked in a 2011 study to the promotion of atherosclerosis in humans - of omnivores, vegans and vegetarians, and examined the clinical data of 2,595 patients undergoing elective cardiac evaluations. The research finds that a diet high in carnitine promotes the growth of the bacteria that metabolize carnitine, compounding the problem by producing even more of the artery-clogging TMAO. 

    Stanley Hazen, M.D., Ph.D.:

    Carnitine metabolism suggests a new way to help explain why a diet rich in red meat promotes atherosclerosis.

    The bacteria living in our digestive tracts are dictated by our long-term dietary patterns. A diet high in carnitine actually shifts our gut microbe composition to those that like carnitine, making meat eaters even more susceptible to forming TMAO and its artery-clogging effects. Meanwhile, vegans and vegetarians have a significantly reduced capacity to synthesize TMAO from carnitine, which may explain the cardiovascular health benefits of these diets.

    Carnitine is naturally occurring in red meats, including beef, venison, lamb, mutton, duck, and pork. It is also a dietary supplement available in pill form and a common ingredient in energy drinks

  • Satisfying Fruitarian Food Days

    Here are two examples of two random satisfying days of vegan fruitarian food for one female and one male persons.

    How is your "perfect" day of food looks like? 

    Yesterday was one of mine (Fruitarian Lena):

    • two glasses of freshly made organic orange juice,
    • a great smoothie with strawberries, purple grapes, bananas and oranges,
    • ~50 g of organic raw zucchini chips (with sesame and sunflower seeds),
    • a few dehydrated tomatoes,
    • tried 4-5 pea sprouts for the first time,
    • a big bowl of organic blueberries and blackberries,
    • a pound pack (1/2 kg) of very ripe dark red organic strawberries!
  • Nori and Chlorella for B12

    A nutritional analysis for the dietary food intake and serum vitamin B12 (cobalamin) level of a group of 6 vegan children aged 7 to 14 who had been living on a vegan diet for 4 to 10 years suggests that consumption of nori may keep vegans from suffering vitamin B12 deficiency.

    Rauma et al. also reported that vegans consuming nori and/or chlorella had a serum vitamin B12 concentration twice as high as those not consuming these algae.

  • Vegetarian Diets and Health

    Vegetarian diets do not contain meat, poultry or fish, vegan diets further exclude dairy products and eggs. Vegetarian and vegan diets can vary widely.

    In general, vegetarian diets provide relatively large amounts of cereals, pulses, nuts, fruits and vegetables.

    In terms of nutrients, vegetarian diets are usually

    • rich in carbohydrates, n-6 fatty acids, dietary fibre, carotenoids, folic acid, vitamin C, vitamin E and Mg,
    • relatively low in protein, saturated fat, long-chain n-3 fatty acids, retinol, vitamin B12, zinc (Zn),
    • vegans may have particularly low intakes of vitamin B12 and low intakes of Ca.

    On average, vegetarians and vegans have a relatively low BMI and a low plasma cholesterol concentration, but higher plasma homocysteine concentrations than in non-vegetarians. Overall, the data suggest that the health of Western vegetarians is good and similar to that of comparable non-vegetarians.

  • Vegetarian Diets and Heart Disease

    In comparison with regular meat eaters, mortality from ischemic heart disease was

    • 20% lower in occasional meat eaters,
    • 34% lower in people who ate fish but not meat,
    • 34% lower in lacto-ovo-vegetarians,
    • 26% lower in vegans.

    There were no significant differences between vegetarians and non-vegetarians in mortality from the other causes of death examined.

  • Vegan Diet Protects from Cancer

    Vegan diets showed statistically significant protection for overall cancer in both genders combined, and for female-specific cancers.

  • Toxic Acrylamide in Cooked Plant Foods

    In 2010, the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization / World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) concluded that acrylamide is a human health concern. Certain doses of acrylamide are toxic to animals and humans.

    Although acrylamide has known toxic effects on the nervous system and on fertility, the 2002 report by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization (WHO) concluded the intake level required to observe neuropathy (0.5 mg/kg body weight/day) was 500 times higher than the average dietary intake of acrylamide (1 μg/kg body weight/day). For effects on fertility, the level is 2,000 times higher than the average intake.

    Acrylamide is a neurotoxin by either oral (in animals) or inhalation exposure (in humans and in animals). Toxic effects are central and peripheral neuropathy causing drowsiness, hallucinations, distal numbness, and ataxia. Recovery is possible after cessation of exposure. 

    Acrylamide is typically found in plant-based foods cooked with high heat (e.g., frying, roasting, and baking), not raw plant-based foods or foods cooked by steaming or boiling (below 120 degrees Celsius / 248 Fahrenheit). Potato chips and French fries were found to contain higher levels of acrylamide compared with other foods.

    The European Chemical Agency added acrylamide to the list of substances of very high concern in March 2010.

    Acrylamide is known to causecancer in animals. It is not clear, as of 2016, whether acrylamide consumption increases people's risk of developing cancer. 

  • Calcium Rich Fruits and Seeds

    Recommended intake of calcium for adults 19–50 years, in milligrams per day (RDA, recommended dietary allowances based on North American and western European data) is  1000 mga day (1 g).

    Example of calcium plant food sources, fruit and seeds: 

    • Sesame seeds, whole, roasted - 989 mg calcium / 100 g.
    • Chia seeds, dried - 631 mg calcium / 100 g. 
    • Figs, dried - 162 mg calcium / 100 g, ~ 600 g figs for 1000 mg (1 g) calcium
    • Olives, ripe, canned - 94 mg calcium / 100 g.
    • Dates, medjool - 64 mg calcium / 100 g.

Socrates

Thou should eat to live, not live to eat. 

Veganism

Veganism is the practice of abstaining from the use of animal products, particularly in diet, and an associated rejection of the commodity status of animals. A follower of either the diet or the philosophy is known as a vegan.

Dietary vegans refrain from eating animal products, not only meat but also egg and dairy products and other animal-derived products. The term "ethical vegan" is often applied to those who extend the philosophy beyond diet into other areas of their lives. Environmental veganism refers to avoiding animal products on the premise that harvesting or industrial farming of animals is environmentally damaging and unsustainable.

The term vegan was coined in 1944 by Donald Watson when he co-founded the Vegan Society in England. At first this meant "non-dairy vegetarian" and later that one "should live without exploiting animals". 

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