All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Vegetables

Vegetables is a broad term for parts of plants used as food - leaves, stems, roots, etc. The term vegetable is largely defined through culinary and cultural tradition, it usually excludes other plant foods such as fruits, nuts, and cereal grains, but includes seeds such as pulses.

  • Only Third of Pre-School Kids Eat Minimal Recommended Servings of Fruits and Vegetables

    Most parents thought their child consumed enough fruits and vegetables, however, only 30% of preschoolers met the recommendation for just 5 daily servings.

  • Polyphenols are Antioxidants in Plant Food

    Polyphenols are secondary metabolites of plants and are generally involved in defense against ultraviolet radiation or aggression by pathogens. In the last decade, there has been much interest in the potential health benefits of dietary plant polyphenols as antioxidant. Epidemiological studies and associated meta-analyses strongly suggest that long term consumption of diets rich in plant polyphenols offer protection against development of cancers, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, osteoporosis and neurodegenerative diseases. 

    Polyphenols are naturally occurring compounds found largely in the fruits, vegetables, cereals and beverages. Fruits like grapes, apple, pear, cherries and berries contains up to 200–300 mg polyphenols per 100 grams fresh weight. The products manufactured from these fruits, also contain polyphenols in significant amounts. Typically a glass of red wine or a cup of tea or coffee contains about 100 mg polyphenols. Cereals, dry legumes and chocolate also contribute to the polyphenolic intake. 

    Favonoids comprise the most studied group of polyphenols. 

  • Beta-Carotene Supplements and Cancer

    Plant foods have an important preventive influence in a population at high risk for lung cancer. However, persons who use beta-carotene supplements do not benefit from the protective compounds in plant foods.

  • 5 Main Elements of Healthy Diet by WHO

    From World Health Organization - 5 elements of a healthy diet:

    1) Fruits, vegetables, legumes (e.g. lentils, beans), nuts and whole grains (e.g. unprocessed maize, millet, oats, wheat, brown rice).

    2) At least 400 g (5 portions) of fruits and vegetables a day. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, cassava and other starchy roots are not classified as fruits or vegetables.

    3) Less than 10% of total energy intake from free sugars, which is equivalent to 50 g (or around 12 level teaspoons) for a person of healthy body weight consuming approximately 2000 calories per day, but ideally less than 5% of total energy intake for additional health benefits. Most free sugars are added to foods or drinks by the manufacturer, cook or consumer, and can also be found in sugars naturally present in honey, syrups, fruit juices and fruit juice concentrates.

    4) Less than 30% of total energy intake from fats. Unsaturated fats (e.g. found in fish, avocado, nuts, sunflower, canola and olive oils) are preferable to saturated fats (e.g. found in fatty meat, butter, palm and coconut oil, cream, cheese, ghee and lard). Industrial trans fats (found in processed food, fast food, snack food, fried food, frozen pizza, pies, cookies, margarines and spreads) are not part of a healthy diet.

    5) Less than 5 g of salt (equivalent to approximately 1 teaspoon) per day and use iodized salt.

  • Do Fruitarians Eat Only Sweet Fruits?

    Fruitarian diet is fruit and seeds based, and may include other foods, and not only plants (e.g. algae, mushrooms) - to answer a few recent questions at once.

    Please, do not assume that fruitarianism is eating sweet fruit only. There are many kinds of fruitarians. From those who avoid seeds, if they can, to those who consider honey and eggs to be ethical choices, depending on the circumstances. Usually, fresh fruits are preferable, but the proportion of cooked foods varies. Some fruitarians soak or sprout seeds, some not. Some eat more greens or root/stem vegetables, others prefer botanical fruit, including non-sweet kinds (like tomatoes, cucumbers, squash).

    Most fruitarians have ethical or environmental concerns, some may not, health or performance may be their primary motivation. There are frugans, seasonal fruitarians, freegans, raw vegans or vegetarians with high fruit intake, and so on. Everybody is welcome here :)

    There is no ideal food or method, there is no competition for higher ethics or better health. The idea is to present this topic to more people for an ongoing public discussion and to share knowledge and experience.

  • Fruits and Vegetables at Young Age and Arteries

    Those who ate the most fruits and vegetables as young adults were 26 percent less likely to have calcified plaque in their arteries than those who ate the least. This plaque is associated with hardening of the arteries, which increases the risk of heart disease.

  • More Fruits and Vegetables Is Better

    “Eat more fruits and vegetables” is timeless advice that has the backing of a large body of evidence. Vegetables and fruits provide fiber, slowly digested carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals, and numerous phytonutrients that have been associated with protection against cardiovascular disease, aging-related vision loss due to cataract and macular degeneration, and maintenance of bowel function. The connection between vegetables and fruits and cancer is less well established. Although they do not have a blanket anticancer effect, fruits and vegetables may work against specific cancers, including esophageal, stomach, lung, and colorectal cancer. 

    Fruits and vegetables should be consumed in abundance, which means a minimum of five servings a day—and more is better. As few as 1 in 4 persons in the United States meet this guideline.

    Patrick J. Skerrett, MA, Walter C. Willett

  • Fruits and Vegetables for Cataract Prevention

    Dr. Chris Hammond, the chair of ophthalmology at King's College, recommends to increase intake of fruit and vegetables to protect eyes from cataracts:

    "We found no beneficial effect from supplements, only from the vitamin C in the diet".

    The full text of the study "Genetic and Dietary Factors Influencing the Progression of Nuclear Cataract" - see the second link. 

  • Decline in Consumption of Fruit and Vegetables in USA

    Between 1999 and 2008, the actual number of servings of fruit and vegetables declined by about 10 percent and 7 percent, respectively.

Charles Darwin

There is no fundamental difference between man and animals in their ability to feel pleasure and pain, happiness, and misery. 

Ethics and Aesthetics

Ethics - moral principles that govern behavior of a person or a group.

Ethics can refer to standards of right and wrong that prescribe what a human ought to do. Ethical standards include standards relating to rights (e.g. right to life, the right to freedom from injury).

Laws, and social norms, or feelings can differ from what is ethical. It is necessary for individuals to frequently examine own standards to ensure that they are reasonable. 

Ethics as moral philosophy involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct. Moral philosophy is related to the fields of moral psychology, descriptive ethics, and value theory.

As a branch of philosophy, ethics investigates the questions

  • "What is the best way for people to live?
  • "What actions are right or wrong in particular circumstances?"

Axiology is the philosophical study of value, collective term for ethics and aesthetics - philosophical fields that depend crucially on notions of worth. 

Aesthetics studies the concepts of "beauty" and "harmony." Aesthetics (esthetics) is a branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of art, beauty, and taste, creation and appreciation of beauty. It is more scientifically defined as the study of sensori-emotional values. More broadly, aesthetics is defined as "critical reflection on art, culture and nature."

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