All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Vegetables

Vegetables is a broad term for parts of plants used as food - leaves, stems, roots, etc. The term vegetable is largely defined through culinary and cultural tradition, it usually excludes other plant foods such as fruits, nuts, and cereal grains, but includes seeds such as pulses.

  • Fruits and Vegetables for Healthy Eyes

    Vision: Eating fruits and vegetables can keep your eyes healthy, and may help prevent common aging-related eye diseases - cataracts and macular degeneration - which afflict millions of Americans over age 65. 

  • Fruits and Vegetables for Healthier Arteries in Later Life

    Women who reported consuming the most fruits and vegetables (8 to 9 servings a day for a 2,000-calorie diet) in their 20s were 40% less likely to have calcified plaque in their arteries in their 40s compared with those who ate the least amount (3 to 4 servings a day) during the same time period.

    This association persisted even after researchers accounted for other lifestyle behaviors, as well as for their current-day diets, further demonstrating the role dietary patterns at younger ages may play.

  • Vegetables and Fresh and Dry Fruit and Longer Life

    Consumption of vegetables, salad and fresh or dried fruit is robustly associated with decreased mortality.

    A robust inverse association exists between fruit and vegetable consumption and mortality, with benefits seen in up to 7+ portions daily.

  • Fresh Fruits to Live Longer

    To live longer, eat 7+ pieces of fresh fruits or vegetables a day, but not canned or frozen.

    People who ate at least 7 portions of fruit and vegetables each day were 42% less likely to die from any cause.

    It was shown in a recent European study that followed more than 65 thousands participants over 12 years. People with the highest intakes were also 25% less likely to die from cancer and 31% less likely to die from heart disease. Analyzing studies like this, we need to remember that term “vegetables” usually include non-sweet fruits in botanical sense, like tomatoes, bell peppers, cucumbers, eggplants, squashes, and many others. See VegetablesFruits.

    But canned and frozen fruit increased the risk of dying by 17%, and fruit juice was found to have no significant benefit.

    The lead author of this study, Dr. Oyinlola Oyebode of department of epidemiology and public health in UCL, said:

    “The clear message here is that the more fruit and vegetables you eat, the less likely you are to die at any age. My advice would be however much you are eating now, eat more.” 

  • Children Want to Eat Fruits and Vegetables

    Little kids (3-5) who learned about fruits and vegetables were more likely to identify them as healthy and want to eat them.

  • Fruits and Vegetables Can Save Lives and Money

    If Americans ate just one more serving of fruits or vegetables per day, this would save more than 30,000 lives and $5 billion in medical costs each year.

    If Americans were to follow current USDA recommendations for daily consumption of fruits and vegetables, those numbers would go up to more than 127,000 lives and $17 billion saved.

    The increased longevity that would result if Americans ate the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables is worth over $11 trillion.

  • Fruits and Vegetables for Better Skin in 6 Weeks

    Increased fruit and vegetable consumption confers measurable and perceptibly beneficial effects on Caucasian skin appearance within 6 weeks.

    Fruit and vegetable consumption and ingestion of carotenoids have been found to be associated with human skin-color (yellowness) in a recent cross-sectional study. This carotenoid-based coloration contributes beneficially to the appearance of health in humans and is held to be a sexually selected cue of condition in other species.

  • Citrus Fruits, Apples and Tomatoes and Cancer

    A reduced risk of several forms of cancer (mainly of digestive tract) was found for high consumption of citrus fruit, apples and tomatoes.

  • Weight Loss with Fruits and Vegetables

    An increase in total fruit intake was associated with a change in weight of -0.53 lb (a weight loss of 0.24 kg), and an increase in total vegetable intake was associated with a weight change of -0.25 lb (a weight loss of 0.11 kg) - for each extra daily serving over a 4 years period.

    133,468 US men and women were followed for up to 24 years. The benefits of increased consumption were strongest for berries, apples or pears, tofu (soy), cauliflower, and cruciferous and green leafy vegetables. Increased satiety with fewer calories could be partly responsible. Obesity is a primary risk factor for many life-shortening health conditions.

  • Vegetables

    Vegetable is any part of a plant that is consumed by humans as food. The term "vegetable" is largely defined through culinary and cultural tradition. It normally excludes other food derived from plants such as fruits, nuts and cereal grains, but includes seeds such as pulses. (Search Vegetables)

George Bernard Shaw

The thought of two thousand people crunching celery at the same time horrified me.

Lifestyle

Lifestyle - interests, opinions, and behavioural orientations of an individual, group, or culture. 

Personal lifestyle typically reflects individual attitudes, way of life, values, world view, and personal identity. Not all aspects of a lifestyle are voluntary. Surrounding social and technical systems can constrain the lifestyle choices available to the individual. Location is important factor of lifestyle. The nature of the neighborhood in which a person resides affects the set of lifestyles available to that person due to differences in degrees of affluence and proximity to natural and cultural environments. 

Lifestyle may include views on politics, religion, health, and intimacy.

For example, "green lifestyle" means holding beliefs and engaging in activities that consume fewer resources and produce less harmful waste, and deriving a sense of self from holding these beliefs and engaging in these activities.

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