All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Fruit plants never get paid for producing our food, unless we spread their seed in their habitat. Latest edition: Fruit plants never get paid for producing our food – the flesh of the fruits, unless we spread seeds of the fruits we have eaten into their species' habitat.

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Lena Nechet
+1 # Lena Nechet 2018-01-05 11:18
Welcome, Toni!
I guess, plants do not consciously participate in our economies :) I think we should pay them back for the fruit with care and protection.
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Тони
+1 # Тони 2018-02-10 15:05
Well, Lena, the necessary and sufficient care and protection for the plants, from us – the fruit eaters, is to give the chance for their seeds, which have been taken away within the fruits we eat, to reproduce their respective species, wherever, whenever and however those/they may grow on their own.
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Lena Nechet
0 # Lena Nechet 2018-02-10 15:32
Well, that's one way to look at it.
I see plants as individual beens, not like a mechanical element of their species. As with animals, I will treat individuals with respect and try to do my reasonable best to help them flourish. I do not see it as my responsibility or ability, however, to ensure their plentiful procreation. I have an article about it on this site.
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Тони
0 # Тони 2018-02-11 17:53
I don't feel like having implied a “mechanical element” concept. I guess you mention it to your liking, Lena.

Fruit plants produce our food naturally without our intervention. They don't ask for help. What they do but, without asking us, is putting their seeds in the fruits. This apparently shows what they rely upon for procreation; which is what we naturally can help them with, easily.

I say “give the chance ... to reproduce ... on their own”, not “ensure ... plentiful ...”, once again, Lena.
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Тони
0 # Тони 2018-02-11 17:57
So, which one is the article you mention, Lena?
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Тони
0 # Тони 2018-02-14 04:13
Guessing the article is “Seeds in Fruitarian Diet?”.
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Aristotle

I count him braver who overcomes his desires than him who conquers his enemies, for the hardest victory is over self.

Protein Digestibility-Corrected Amino Acid Score

The protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) has been adopted by FAO/WHO as the preferred method for the measurement of the protein value in human nutrition. 

PDCAAS = Amino Acid Score x Digestibility

The method is based on comparison of the concentration of the first limiting essential amino acid in the test protein with the concentration of that amino acid in a reference (scoring) pattern. This scoring pattern is derived from the essential amino acid requirements of the preschool-age child.

Although the principle of the PDCAAS method has been widely accepted, critical questions have been raised in the scientific community:

  1. the validity of the preschool-age child amino acid requirement values (more than 4 times greater than the EAA requirement for an adult),
  2. the validity of correction for fecal instead of ileal digestibility,
  3. the truncation of PDCAAS values to 100%.

The reference scoring pattern was based on studies performed more than 25 years ago on a limited number of 2-year-old children recovering from malnutrition.

According to the current official recommendations, a 2-year old child needs ~ 3x higher essential-to-non-essential amino acid ratio, and needs essential amino acids in different proportions than adult. Methionine/cysteine is the limiting essential amino acids for adults, and for children it is lysine or tryptophan.

The use of fecal digestibility overestimates the nutritional value of a protein because amino acid nitrogen entering the colon is lost for protein synthesis in the body and is, at least in part, excreted in urine as ammonia.

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