All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Society

Groups of people involved in social interaction, large social groups sharing the same geographical or social territory, often with similar cultural preferences - nations, communities, humanity.

  • Fruit and Diabetes Type 2

    Researchers in Denmark randomized 63 patients to high fruit or low fruit intake, and after 12 weeks, the 2 groups had similar drops in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, weight, and girth. They enrolled patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes who had been referred for nutritional counseling. The patients were an even mix of men and women, with a mean age of 58 years and a mean body mass index (BMI) of 32.  

    Allan S. Christensen, the lead of the research group: 

    We conclude that advice to restrict fruit intake as part of standard [medical nutrition therapy] in overweight adults with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus does not improve glycemic control, body weight, or waist circumference.

    The 32 subjects in the low-fruit-intake group were advised eat no more than 2 pieces of fruit a day, whereas the 31 subjects in the high-fruit-intake group were told to indulge in 2 or more pieces of fruit a day.

    A piece of fruit was defined as the amount that contained about 10 g of carbohydrate - for example, an apple (100 g), half a banana (50 g), or an orange (125 g). The subjects were also instructed to eat whole fruit, skip dried fruit, and not drink fruit juice.

    Over the 12 weeks, on average, fruit consumption rose from 194 g/day to 319 g/day in the high-intake group and decreased from 186 g/day to 135 g/day in the low-intake group.

    Patients in the high-fruit-intake group had a significant drop in HbAIC levels, from 6.74% to 6.26%. They also lost about 2 kg (from 92 kg to 90 kg) and trimmed their waist by about 4 cm (from 103 to 99 cm). Similar results were obtained by patients in the low-fruit-intake group, and there were no significant between-group differences in these 3 outcomes.

  • To Selfishness by Mexie Mermaid

    This is an exchange of comments about ideas expressed in a video by Mexie Mermaid "Have Nothing, Give Everything. [Buddhism and Selfishness]"

    Fruitarian Lena: 

    I wonder about your sources for the base idea of selfishness. It sounds like popularized nonsense (sorry, I like your channel, and expect more :) 

    So, all people who save money for their future or business, are selfish?! I don't know people who don't want to give anything of theirs for anything. 

    Do you know a bit from history, what happens when property rights are not respected? And what on Earth "patriarchy" has to do with it?

  • Response to Liberation Pledge

    I learned about this DxE pledge on the great channel ModVegan, and commented: 

    Margaret, this is the first time I hear about this Liberation Pledge (thank you), and I am completely against it.

    Positive pear-pressure? They are calling for acts of public disrespect to the participants' closest people! The first result will be alienation of these people from their loved ones, colleagues, and clients, and in deep personal problems.

    Your alternative is much better, but every vegan would act this way in most situations anyway. I am a long-term vegan, BTW. 

  • Carnitine and Microflora

    Intestinal microbiota may contribute to the well-established link between high levels of red meat consumption and cardiovascular disease risk. 

    The study tested the carnitine and trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) levels - a metabolite the researchers previously linked in a 2011 study to the promotion of atherosclerosis in humans - of omnivores, vegans and vegetarians, and examined the clinical data of 2,595 patients undergoing elective cardiac evaluations. The research finds that a diet high in carnitine promotes the growth of the bacteria that metabolize carnitine, compounding the problem by producing even more of the artery-clogging TMAO. 

    Stanley Hazen, M.D., Ph.D.:

    Carnitine metabolism suggests a new way to help explain why a diet rich in red meat promotes atherosclerosis.

    The bacteria living in our digestive tracts are dictated by our long-term dietary patterns. A diet high in carnitine actually shifts our gut microbe composition to those that like carnitine, making meat eaters even more susceptible to forming TMAO and its artery-clogging effects. Meanwhile, vegans and vegetarians have a significantly reduced capacity to synthesize TMAO from carnitine, which may explain the cardiovascular health benefits of these diets.

    Carnitine is naturally occurring in red meats, including beef, venison, lamb, mutton, duck, and pork. It is also a dietary supplement available in pill form and a common ingredient in energy drinks

  • Dietary Reference Intake DRI

    Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) are reference values that are quantitative estimates of nutrient intakes to be used for planning and assessing diets for healthy people. They include both recommended intakes and upper intake levels.

    Although the reference values are based on data, the data are often insufficient or drawn from studies that had limitations in addressing the question. Scientific judgment is required in setting the reference values. 

    • EAR - Estimated Average Requirement - a nutrient intake value that is estimated to meet the requirement of half the healthy individuals in a group.
    • RDA - Recommended Dietary Allowance - the average daily dietary intake level that is sufficient to meet the nutrient requirement of nearly all (97 to 98 percent) healthy individuals in a group.
    • AI - Adequate Intake: a value based on observed or experimentally determined approximations of nutrient intake by a group of healthy people.
      Used when an RDA cannot be determined.
    • UL - Tolerable Upper Intake Level - the highest level of daily nutrient intake that is likely to pose no risk of adverse health effects to almost all individuals in the general population. As intake increases above the UL, the risk of adverse effects increases.
  • Child's Right to Adequate Nutrition

    A child’s right to adequate and appropriate nutrition is stipulated under Article 6 and 24 of the Convention on the Right’s of the Child. 

    In 2010, an estimated 171 million children (167 million of whom live in developing countries) were stunted. Children who are stunted are at a greater risk of having difficulty learning, playing, engaging in normal childhood activities and being productive members of society later in life. Undernourished children are also more susceptible to frequent and repeated disease and illness due to a weakened immune response, as well as at a greater risk of becoming overweight or obese later in life.

    A child’s nutritional future begins with the mother’s nutritional status in adolescence and during pregnancy.

  • Overnutrition

    Overnutrition, a type of malnutrition, is emerging with rates of obesity and related chronic diseases associated with urbanisation, aging populations, technological development and globalisation of food supplies and industry. Billions of dollars are spent annually by the food industry to promote the consumption of highly refined, high-calorie foods with little or no nutritional value. 

    At least 35 million overweight children are living in developing countries and 8 million in developed countries. Children are increasingly exposed to high-fat, high-sugar, high-salt, energy-dense, micronutrient-poor foods which tend to be cheaper than healthy foods. General imbalance in energy intake compared to physical activity levels is driving the obesity epidemic. In industrialised countries, child obesity risk is associated with lower household income, women with less education, and single parent households.

    Obesity is increasingly prevalent among adolescent girls and women, as access to a greater quantity of inexpensive, tasty, and convenient foods increases. 

    Taxation on high-calorie, low-nutrition foods can play a significant role in reducing the consumption of such products. Population-wide weight-control campaigns that raise awareness among medical staff, policy-makers and the public at large can also help to reduce obesity. Particularly important is the promotion of health literacy. Additional measures include restrictions on the marketing of unhealthy foods and sugary drinks to children, and controls on the use of misleading health and nutrition claims; mandatory front-of-pack food labelling helps consumers to identify healthier options. 

  • Climate Change and Food Security

    Climate change further threatens food security through its impact on global food production and consequently on food prices. With growing populations and higher demand for food, the impact of climate change could result in an increase of 20% of people at risk of chronic hunger.

  • Paleo Diet Based on Fruits and Seeds

    About paleo diet from an expert Christina Warinner: paleo people did not eat much meat, they did eat seeds, grains and legumes, of cause fresh fruit. Their diets were regionally and seasonably variable.

  • Blue Iridescent Fruits without Pigment

    Blue iridescent berry, no blue pigment

    Blue African fruit of a plant plant Pollia condensata contains no blue pigment. The blue and its iridescent shine are caused by a Bragg reflection - intense peaks of light generated at certain wavelengths and angles - created by spirally stacked cellulose fibers that form multiple layers in the fruit's skin.

John Stuart Mill

A person may cause evil to others not only by his actions but by his inaction, and in either case he is justly accountable to them for the injury.

Vitamin B9 Folic Acid

Vitamin B9, also called folate or folic acid, is one of 8 B vitamins.

  • Folic acid is the synthetic form of B9, found in supplements and fortified foods.
  • Folate occurs naturally in foods.

Folic acid is crucial for proper brain function and plays an important role in mental and emotional health. It aids in the production of DNA and RNA, the body's genetic material, and is especially important when cells and tissues are growing rapidly, such as in infancy, adolescence, and pregnancy.

Folic acid also works closely with vitamin B12 to help make red blood cells and help iron work properly in the body.

Rich sources of folate include: spinach, dark leafy greens, asparagus, mustard greens, brussels sprouts, beans, soybeans, root vegetables, whole grains, oranges, avocado. 

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