All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Society

Groups of people involved in social interaction, large social groups sharing the same geographical or social territory, often with similar cultural preferences - nations, communities, humanity.

  • Fruits and Vegetables against Specific Cancer Types

    Statistically significant protective effect of fruit and vegetable consumption was found in 128 of 156 dietary studies that examined the relationship between fruit and vegetable intake and cancers of the lung, colon, breast, cervix, esophagus, oral cavity, stomach, bladder, pancreas, and ovary.

    For most cancer sites, persons with low fruit and vegetable intake (at least the lower one-fourth of the population) experience about twice the risk of cancer compared with those with high intake, even after control for potentially confounding factors:

    • For lung cancer, significant protection was found in 24 of 25 studies after control for smoking in most instances.
    • Fruits, in particular, were significantly protective in cancers of the esophagus, oral cavity, and larynx, for which 28 of 29 studies were significant.
    • Strong evidence of a protective effect of fruit and vegetable consumption was seen in cancers of the pancreas and stomach (26 of 30 studies), as well as in colorectal and bladder cancers (23 of 38 studies).
    • For cancers of the cervix, ovary, and endometrium, a significant protective effect was shown in 11 of 13 studies, and for breast cancer a protective effect was found to be strong and consistent in a meta analysis.

    It would appear that major public health benefits could be achieved by substantially increasing consumption of these foods.

  • Fruits and Vegetables for Cancer Prevention

    Diets rich in fruit and vegetables have been recommended for preventing cancer. 

    A significant reduction in the risks of cancers of the esophagus, lung, stomach, and colorectum associated with both fruit and vegetables.

    Breast cancer is associated with vegetables but not with fruit. The risk reduction is significant for cancers of thelung andbladder and only forfruit.

    Bladder cancer is associated with fruit but not with vegetables. 

  • Protection with Vegetarian and Vegan Diets

    Vegetarians, those who avoid meat, represent 5% of the US population, and vegans, additionally avoiding dairy and eggs, 2%.

    Vegetarian diets confer protection against

    • cardiovascular diseases,
    • cardiometabolic risk factors,
    • some cancers, 
    • total mortality.

    Compared to lacto-ovo-vegetarian diets, vegan diets seem to offer additional protection for

    • obesity,
    • hypertension,
    • type-2 diabetes, 
    • cardiovascular mortality.

    Males experience greater health benefits than females. 

  • High-Fat Meals May Be Protrombotic

    The high-fat meals (42% of energy from fat) caused, in contrast to the low-fat meals (6% of energy from fat), considerable increases in plasma triglycerides. The five different fat qualities - rapeseed oil, olive oil, sunflower oil, palm oil, or butter - caused similar postprandial increases in plasma triglycerides. These findings indicate that high-fat meals may be prothrombotic, irrespective of their fatty acid composition

  • Fruits Reduce Risk of Lung and Bladder Cancers

    Case-control studies overall support a significant reduction in the risks of cancers of the esophagus, lung, stomach, and colorectum associated with both fruit and vegetables.

    Breast cancer is associated with vegetables but not with fruit.

    Bladder cancer is associated with fruit but not with vegetables.

    The overall relative risk estimates from cohort studies suggest a protective effect of both fruit and vegetables for most cancer sites considered, but the risk reduction is significant only for cancers of the lung and bladder and only for fruit.

  • Fruitarians Are Not Alike

    In a long discussion on youtube that started with my comment (it  was later deleted), in which I was objecting some points the author of the video made, on one point I responded to another person, who asked me about fruitarianism after I mentioned it:

    The one thing I should to tell you here is that fruitarians are not all alike, there are not many of them (us) but they all have their unique set of reasons to follow this lifestyle. For example, my reasons developed from ethical, aesthetic and habitual considerations, many fruitarians are religiously driven (I am a lifelong atheist myself), many think that raw food is the answer to all health challenges and eat lots of fruit as a part of the diet (I am not a raw-foodie), some do not even consume seeds, and subset of this group believe that seeds are just like babies; some eat leaves, some don't, not all fruitarians are vegans, etc. The only thing I found similar among all fruitarians I know, is that the biggest part of their diet (~75%) is fruit, usually fresh, and there are some studies already made that could be used in support of such choice. 

    I hope it gives you some idea about the absence of uniformity in fruitarianism, and why discussing it here is not preferable. Also, I am obviously not able to speak neither for all fruitarians, nor for all vegans.

  • Vitamin C in Muscles

    The study has shown that skeletal muscle is very sensitive to changes in vitamin C intake, and that the vitamin C content in muscle will fall if intake decreases below optimal levels. This is likely to affect muscle function. Muscle is the largest store of vitamin C in our bodies.

    Professor Margreet Vissers, from the Centre for Free Radical Research:

    Many people think that all fruit and vegetables are equally able to supply vitamin C, but this is not the case. The levels in food vary hugely across the spectrum. We should eat a good range daily, but because many fruit contain only one tenth of a healthy daily vitamin C requirement, we would recommend at least one serve per day of a high-value food like kiwifruit. This will help you easily reach an optimal vitamin C intake, as well as delivering other vital nutrients.

    There is, however, considerable debate regarding the beneficial health effects of vitamin C supplementation. The administration of vitamin C may significantly hamper endurance capacity. Vitamin C supplementation decreases training efficiency because it prevents some cellular adaptations to exercise.

  • Vitamin C Benefits Debate

    Ascorbic acid is essential for collagen, carnitine and neurotransmitters biosynthesis. Most plants and animals synthesize ascorbic acid for their own requirement, butpes and humans can not synthesize it due to lack of an enzyme gulonolactone oxidase

    Though ascorbic acid was discovered in 17th century, the exact role of this vitamin in human biology and health is still a mystery in view of many beneficial claims and controversies.

    Many health benefits have been attributed to ascorbic acid such as antioxidant, anti-atherogenic, anti-carcinogenic, immunomodulator and prevents cold etc. However, lately the health benefits of ascorbic acid has been the subject of debate and controversies:

    • The relation between ascorbic acid and cancer is still a debatable.
    • There is compelling evidence for antioxidant protection of lipids by ascorbic acid both with and without iron co-supplementation.
    • Current evidences suggest that ascorbic acid protects against atherogenesis by inhibiting LDL oxidation.
    • The data on vitamin C and DNA damage are conflicting and inconsistent. 

  • Vitamin C and Common Cold

    Clinical trails with varying doses of ascorbic acid showed that ascorbic acid does not have significant prophylactic effect, but reduced the severity and duration of symptoms of cold during the period of infection.

    Consumption of ascorbic acid as high as 1 g a day for several winter months, had no consistent beneficial effect on the incidence of common cold.

    There was a consistent beneficial but generally modest therapeutic effect on duration of cold symptoms

    In trials that tested vitamin C after cold symptoms occurred, there was some evidence of greater benefits with large dose than with lower doses.

  • Fruit and Diabetes Type 2

    Researchers in Denmark randomized 63 patients to high fruit or low fruit intake, and after 12 weeks, the 2 groups had similar drops in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, weight, and girth. They enrolled patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes who had been referred for nutritional counseling. The patients were an even mix of men and women, with a mean age of 58 years and a mean body mass index (BMI) of 32.  

    Allan S. Christensen, the lead of the research group: 

    We conclude that advice to restrict fruit intake as part of standard [medical nutrition therapy] in overweight adults with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus does not improve glycemic control, body weight, or waist circumference.

    The 32 subjects in the low-fruit-intake group were advised eat no more than 2 pieces of fruit a day, whereas the 31 subjects in the high-fruit-intake group were told to indulge in 2 or more pieces of fruit a day.

    A piece of fruit was defined as the amount that contained about 10 g of carbohydrate - for example, an apple (100 g), half a banana (50 g), or an orange (125 g). The subjects were also instructed to eat whole fruit, skip dried fruit, and not drink fruit juice.

    Over the 12 weeks, on average, fruit consumption rose from 194 g/day to 319 g/day in the high-intake group and decreased from 186 g/day to 135 g/day in the low-intake group.

    Patients in the high-fruit-intake group had a significant drop in HbAIC levels, from 6.74% to 6.26%. They also lost about 2 kg (from 92 kg to 90 kg) and trimmed their waist by about 4 cm (from 103 to 99 cm). Similar results were obtained by patients in the low-fruit-intake group, and there were no significant between-group differences in these 3 outcomes.

Pythagoras

As long as Man continues to be the ruthless destroyer of lower living beings, he will never know health or peace.

Bacteria and Archaea

Archaea and bacteria (eubacteria) are single-celled organisms that do not have a nucleus or organelles. Archaea have a distinct evolutionary history and biochemistry compared with bacteria.

Archaea - a domain of single-celled microorganisms. These microbes are prokaryotes. Archaea can survive in extreme and harsh environments like hot springs, salt lakes, marshlands, oceans, gut of ruminants and humans.

Bacteria - a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms. Typically a few micrometres in length, bacteria have a number of shapes, ranging from spheres to rods and spirals. Eubacteria are ubiquitous and are found in soil, hot springs, radioactive waste water, Earth's crust, organic matter, bodies of plants and animals, etc.

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