All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Vegan Fruitarian and Frugan Shopping

Fruitarian shopping.

  • Growers Ranch, Orange County

    Another local store, Growers Ranch. Checking out my options for fruits and seeds.

  • Growers Direct, Orange County - Fruit Haul

    Fruitarian Shopping in a local market in Costa Mesa, California, " Growers Direct," a neat friendly store. I bought Persimmons and watermelons for a few days. 

  • Grocery Outlet

    After watching the last video by okraw about shopping in one of these store around my area (Orange County, California), I went to one location of Grocery Outlet myself, and checked for vegan fruitarian (frugan) options. 

  • Trader Joe's, Orange County

    I shop in Trader Joe's not that often, but in this video I like to share with you my favorite things in it, and the way I make my rather frugal decisions. 

  • In a Shopping Mall - Wool? Leather? Down?

    Searching for and buying male pants in a local shopping mall in California, looking for options for vegan belts, shoes, and clothing. It took us 4 hours to find a model of cotton khakis that matches two people (they needed the same look).

    Down is harvested as a byproduct of the meat industry, geese and ducks are raised for slaughter. But there’s an economic temptation to live-pluck the birds. The plucking of live birds become rare nowadays,  and is against the law in the US and in several European countries. But live-plucking ducks and geese still practiced at factory farms in China, Poland and Hungary.

  • Smart & Final and Stater Bros

    Buying fruits in SoCal's supermarkets in November: Smart and Final, Stater Bros. - fruit prices, fruitarian / frugan foods I often or sometimes buy (apples, oranges, pears, tomatoes, avocados, green peas, etc.)

Albert Einstein

If people are good only because they fear punishment, then we are a sorry lot indeed. 

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are the sugars, starches and fibers found in fruits, grains, vegetables and milk products, one of the basic food groups.

Sugar is the generalized name for sweet, short-chain, soluble carbohydrates, many of which are used in food. They are composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Simple sugars are called monosaccharides and include glucose (or dextrose), fructose, and galactose. The table sugar most customarily used as food is sucrose - hydrolyses into fructose and glucose in the body. Other disaccharides include maltose and lactose. Longer chains of sugars are called oligosaccharides. 

Starch is a polymeric carbohydrate consisting of a large number of glucose units joined by glycosidic bonds. This polysaccharide is produced by most green plants as an energy store. It is the most common carbohydrate in human diets and is contained in large amounts in staple foods such as potatoes, wheat, maize (corn), rice. Pure starch is a white, tasteless and odorless powder that is insoluble in cold water or alcohol. 

Fiber is consists of non-starch polysaccharides such as arabinoxylans, cellulose, and many other plant components such as resistant starch, resistant dextrins, inulin, lignin, chitins, pectins, beta-glucans, and oligosaccharides, and are derived from plants. Dietary fibers are not digested by gastrointestinal enzymes. Soluble fiber dissolves in water, changes as it goes through the digestive tract, where it is fermented by bacteria, partially into physiologically active byproducts - healthful compounds. Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water and stays intact as it moves through your digestive system, can be prebiotic and metabolically ferment in the large intestine. Dietary fibers can change absorption of other nutrients and chemicals. Some soluble plant fibers can modulate intestinal inflammation and are contrabiotic. Many types of so-called dietary fiber are not actually fibrous.

Fruitarians.net Apple