All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

science

  • Vegan Skeptic Theo Summer on GMO Publications

    Vegan Skeptic Theo Summer on using tools of skepticism for GMO publications and studies:

    Make sure you can identify the title of the study in question and the journal in which it was published. Don't ever take a blog post or a news story reporting on the results as an accurate representation.

    If you can't read the entire study for yourself, use the reputation and the peer review process of the journal in which the study was published to judge how thoroughly the research may have been vetted prior to publication.

    Look for follow-ups or critiques to the study that may have been published. See if the research has been reproduced anywhere else or if any similar studies have obtained similar results.

    Make sure the study used appropriate controls and statistical methods. Ask yourself: “If an identical study had been run with all samples/groups/etc following the control procedure, would a statistically significant result be obtained the expected percentage of the time?”

  • Spotting Bad Science by Andy Brunning

    Many of us rely on media that publish scientific research to adjust our nutrition. Here is something to remember, when evaluating it.

    Spotting Bad Science by a chemistry teacher from UK, Andy Brunning - 12 points to help you separate the science from the pseudoscience:
    1. SENSATIONALISED HEADLINES
    2. MISINTERPRETED RESULTS
    3. CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
    4. CORRELATION & CAUSATION
    5. UNSUPPORTED CONCLUSIONS
    6. PROBLEMS WITH SAMPLE SIZE
    7. UNREPRESENTATIVE SAMPLES USED
    8. NO CONTROL GROUP USED
    9. NO BLIND TESTING USED
    10. SELECTIVE REPORTING OF DATA
    11. UNREPLICABLE RESULTS
    12. NON-PEER REVIEWED MATERIAL

  • More Fruits and Vegetables Is Better

    “Eat more fruits and vegetables” is timeless advice that has the backing of a large body of evidence. Vegetables and fruits provide fiber, slowly digested carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals, and numerous phytonutrients that have been associated with protection against cardiovascular disease, aging-related vision loss due to cataract and macular degeneration, and maintenance of bowel function. The connection between vegetables and fruits and cancer is less well established. Although they do not have a blanket anticancer effect, fruits and vegetables may work against specific cancers, including esophageal, stomach, lung, and colorectal cancer. 

    Fruits and vegetables should be consumed in abundance, which means a minimum of five servings a day—and more is better. As few as 1 in 4 persons in the United States meet this guideline.

    Patrick J. Skerrett, MA, Walter C. Willett

  • B12 Supplementation Effective Sublingually and Orally

    A dose of 500 µg of cobalamin given either sublingually or orally is effective in correcting cobalamin deficiency

  • Vitamin B12 Deficiency as a Worldwide Problem

    Pernicious anemia is a common cause of megaloblastic anemia throughout the world and especially in persons of European or African descent. Dietary deficiency of vitamin B12 due to vegetarianism is increasing and causes hyperhomocysteinemia.

    The breast-fed infant of a vitamin B12–deficient mother is at risk for severe developmental abnormalities, growth failure, and anemia. Elevated methylmalonic acid and/or total homocysteine are sensitive indicators of vitamin B12–deficient diets and correlate with clinical abnormalities.

    Dietary vitamin B12 deficiency is a severe problem in the Indian subcontinent, Mexico, Central and South America, and selected areas in Africa. Dietary vitamin B12 deficiency is not prevalent in Asia, except in vegetarians. Areas for research include intermittent vitamin B12 supplement dosing and better measurements of the bioavailability of B12 in fermented vegetarian foods and algae.

  • Fruit and Non-Communicable Diseases

    Insufficient consumption of fruit and vegetables is associated with an increased risk of non-communicable diseases in the population.

    This study found convincing evidence for combining order of placement in a buffet and separating the fruits and vegetables, as a means to increase the quantity of self-served fruit and vegetables and decrease consumption of other meal components among male university students

    This study demonstrated that a nudge design consisting of changing the placement of F&V to the beginning of the serving sequence, and presenting the F&V components in separated bowls increases the self-served quantity of F&V and simultaneously decreased the quantity of non-F&V components in the intervention group and total energy intake.

  • Fruit for Young Women to Prevent Cancer

    The results of the study, published in The British Medical Journal (BMJ), suggest young women should increase their fruit intake, especially during adolescence, in order to prevent cancer.

  • Price of Fruit and Lower Consumption

    A study found people will buy 35% more fruit — or 2.4 additional servings — when the price is discounted by 20%. The effect of discounting had less impact on vegetable consumption. This is unsurprising as fruit is often seen more as a discretionary purchase, akin to a treat.

  • Vegetable Diet and LDL Cholesterol

    Compared with the starch-based and low-fat diets, the high-fiber vegetable diet resulted in the largest reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL, the "bad" kind) cholesterol.

  • Sugars Can Be Turned into Fat

    When we are eating excess amounts of carbohydrates (sugars), liver converts the carbon compounds from sugar into fatty acid, and then fat.

    If we continue to consume too much of sugars, complex or simple, and to accumulate fat, especially in the waist area, we can develop insulin resistance.

Heraclitus

One cannot step twice in the same river.

Vitamin B1 Thiamine

Vitamin B1 (Thiamin, Thiamine) is one of 8 B vitamins, the first B vitamin discovered. All B vitamins help the body convert carbohydrates into glucose, which the body uses to produce energy, B-complex vitamins also help the body metabolize fats and protein. All B vitamins are water soluble.

All living organisms use thiamine, but it is synthesized only in bacteria, fungi, and plants. Animals must obtain it from their diet, therefore for humans it is an essential nutrient.  Your body needs it to form adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which every cell of the body uses for energy.

B1 helps convert food into energy, needed for healthy skin, hair, muscles, and brain. 

Thiamine deficiency has a potentially fatal outcome if it remains untreated. In less-severe cases, nonspecific signs include malaise, weight loss, irritability and confusion.

Recommended daily amount: 1.1 - 1.2 mg (~ 50 g of flaxseeds, or sesame tahini, or 100 g pine or sunflower seeds, or corn flour).

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