All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Responses

Responses, discussions, commentary, answers, reviews

Consulting nutritionist and clinical dietitian in India, Pooja Makhija, on fruitarian diet:

Don Bennet, DAS, in his video "Protein Explained" on his channel health101DOTorg, trying to explain / claim "how protein can cause autoimmune disease," mentioned that there is "unusable protein" and connected it to cooking. 

I asked: 

Don, could you please link to the studies that would support your statements about unusability of cooked proteins?

This article consists of notes I made in January 2014 after reading versions of the humanist Manifesto and other materials (including those by neo-humanists). I got interested in the modern meaning of humanism, following a speech with a debate, in which I participated in US and disagreed with some of the notions. 

Later, during several discussions with other humanists, whom I met while participating in Humanist Fellowship, and my friends (one conversation was a few hours long and followed my notes below step by step), I was explained the cultural and historical context of this document, deeper linguistic meaning and importance of it in US, and therefore I want to state here clearly: I am a humanist, in a general sense. I took an online test on a main humanist site, and the result suggests that I am 100% humanist. If only this document were worded differently.

I republish publish the notes here in case someone wants to discuss it. I met quite a few vegan misanthropes, and I think some form of humanism is important for practicing veganism. Since 2014, I often feel an urge to remind vegans that people are animals too :)

My comment on ModVegan's video "Vegan Sell-Outs":

Everyone can be vegan - just eat vegan, and maybe go further. Veganism is for everyone, in every industry, with any occupation, and situation, and any levels of awareness or ethics. Calling anyone "not real vegan" - especially knowing that being vegan is not a rewarding social position - is unnecessary demanding and even intimidating fashion among vegans, detrimental to the spread of veganism, imho. I observed it for years, and never witnessed anything good or productive resulting from it.

Sorry to disagree on this one, Margaret. 

This is my original article 30Bad Method Critique, first published on Fruitarians.net on June 6th 2010, and for which I was blocked from the community by Freelee (see in the end, for misrepresenting banana industry) The old URL was: fruitarians.net/forum/topic/30bananasaday-com-Method.htm

Now, 6 years later, I decided to publish it again, for the history, and because some of the problems were not resolved, and I just found out recently, how bad it became (RawTill4 - sugar drinks as healthy nutrition, people who criticize them being accused in crimes, violence threats, etc.

I edited the text to adopt it to the new site formatting, and to make it more readable. I also needed to remove a few of my sentences, because the discussions, which provided the context for them on 30bananasaday.com, were deleted. 

The content of this article: Caloric Model, Amount of Food, Cost of that Quantity of Fruit, Bananas and Dates, 100% Raw, One Bite and You Are Lost, Sleep and Water, Suspension

Subcategories

Commentary on relevant to fruitarianism publications, events and products, reviews of books, films, channels, sites and ideas of public personas from fruitarian perspective . 

Fruitarian dialogues, answers to questions related to fruitarianism.

Dhammika Sutta

He should not kill a living being, nor cause it to be killed, nor should he incite another to kill. Do not injure any being, either strong or weak, in the world.

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are the sugars, starches and fibers found in fruits, grains, vegetables and milk products, one of the basic food groups.

Sugar is the generalized name for sweet, short-chain, soluble carbohydrates, many of which are used in food. They are composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Simple sugars are called monosaccharides and include glucose (or dextrose), fructose, and galactose. The table sugar most customarily used as food is sucrose - hydrolyses into fructose and glucose in the body. Other disaccharides include maltose and lactose. Longer chains of sugars are called oligosaccharides. 

Starch is a polymeric carbohydrate consisting of a large number of glucose units joined by glycosidic bonds. This polysaccharide is produced by most green plants as an energy store. It is the most common carbohydrate in human diets and is contained in large amounts in staple foods such as potatoes, wheat, maize (corn), rice. Pure starch is a white, tasteless and odorless powder that is insoluble in cold water or alcohol. 

Fiber is consists of non-starch polysaccharides such as arabinoxylans, cellulose, and many other plant components such as resistant starch, resistant dextrins, inulin, lignin, chitins, pectins, beta-glucans, and oligosaccharides, and are derived from plants. Dietary fibers are not digested by gastrointestinal enzymes. Soluble fiber dissolves in water, changes as it goes through the digestive tract, where it is fermented by bacteria, partially into physiologically active byproducts - healthful compounds. Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water and stays intact as it moves through your digestive system, can be prebiotic and metabolically ferment in the large intestine. Dietary fibers can change absorption of other nutrients and chemicals. Some soluble plant fibers can modulate intestinal inflammation and are contrabiotic. Many types of so-called dietary fiber are not actually fibrous.

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