All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Negative-Calorie Fruits? No!

In a presentation published on youtube, Chef AJ, who is certified in "Plant-Based Nutrition" from Cornell University,  describes the concept of calorie density, promoting weight loss. She claims that you can eat as many of non-sweet fruit and other low in starch vegetables you want, because: 

"...their mostly waner, and fiber and nutrients, you know, you actually spend more calories, chewing non-starchy vegetables and digesting them than in the calories."

My response: 

Why every lecture like this must contain some nonsense? One hour chewing burns only ~10 food calories!

There is no scientific evidence to show that any vegetables or fruits have a zero or negative caloric impact

Celery has a thermic effect - "the amount of energy expenditure above the resting metabolic rate due to the cost of processing food for use and storage" - of ~ 8%, much less than the 100% or more required for a food to have "negative calories". A large piece of celery provides almost 10 calories, but the body expends less than one calorie processing it.

Proteins require the most energy to digest but their a thermic effect is 20%–30% only. A commonly used estimate of the thermic effect of food is about 10% of one's caloric intake. 

Chef AJ replied through her profile Wight Loss Wednesday:

After I provided a link to this article with explanation to a viewer who replied to me with ""chewing and digesting".. digestion does not come for free," Chef AJ responded to my comment as well. First she said: 

I was talking about BMR.

Then she shared this link:

http://lethow.com/health/negative-calorie-foods/

In this article they just repeat the false information: 

Consuming Negative calorie foods will burn more calories in chewing and digestion process  as compared to the calories they provide for the body. Eating these foods will create a calorie-deficit in the body, ultimately helps in weight loss.

Towards the end they admit that:

Our body uses around 10-15% of calories of the food we eat, in order to digest them. Our body also needs energy to break down the food  compound and absorb carbohydrates, proteins, minerals fats, and other nutrients. Our body generates energy from the food we intake.

But they also imply that much more energy is burned by absorption of food. After mechanical and chemical digestion, which require most energy to break the pieces and molecules of food down, they assume or try to make you believe that absorption through the small intestine into the blood would take more than 90% of the calories of these foods for the total to be negative! There is no known scientific foundation for such assumptions. It even goes against common sense to think that the mere absorption of broken down nutrients would require ~10 times more energy than actual breaking down, or to imagine that we could survive with such inefficient bodies. Even if this were true, nutrients from other foods would require similar amounts of energy to be absorbed. 

Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the minimal rate of energy expenditure, usually per day or hour. The measurement requires a strict set of criteria to be met, which include being in a physically and psychologically undisturbed state, in a thermally neutral environment, and in the post-absorptive state (after the food is digested). I do not know what exactly Chef AJ was pointing towards here. 

They also list most non-starchy vegetables and fruits as calorie-negative! How irresponsible. The site, which calls itself "the ultimate guide," does not list any links to their sources, of course. They don't even have about pare or sign their articles. This site looks like an advertisement project, with the content created entirely by paid-per-word copywriters.

As a fruitarian whose energy comes primarily from those fruits, I would be dead not only by now, but after any couple of month period in the last 20+ years. 

These are the fruits and vegetables they list:

Fruits Vegetables Spices 

Apples

Apricots

Blackberries

Cantaloupes

Cranberries

Grapefruit

Guava

Lemons

Oranges

Papayas

Peaches

Pineapples

Plums

Prunes

Raspberries

Strawberries

Tangerines

Tomatoes

Watermelon

Asparagus

Aubergine

Beets

Broccoli

Cabbage

Carrots

Cauliflower

Celery

Chicory

Cress

Cucumbers

Dandelion

Endive

Fennel

Green beans

Lettuce

Onions

Radishes

Spinach

Turnip

Zucchini  

Anise

Cayenne

Chili peppers

Cinnamon

Cloves

Coriander/Cilantro

Cumin

Dill

Fennel seeds

Flax seeds

Garden cress

Garlic

Ginger

Parsley

Mustard seeds

Watercress

Please, don't believe just anyone on the internet, always check the information you rely upon. 

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John Ruskin

I will not kill or hurt any living creature needlessly, nor destroy any beautiful thing, but will strive to save and comfort all gentle life, and guard and perfect all natural beauty upon the earth. 

Vitamin B12 Cobalamin

Vitamin B12, also called cobalamin, is a water-soluble vitamin that has a key role in the normal functioning of the brain and nervous system, and the formation of red blood cells. It is involved in the metabolism of every cell of the human body, especially affecting DNA synthesis, fatty acid and amino acid metabolism.

No fungi, plants, nor animals (including humans) are capable of producing vitamin B12. Only bacteria and archaea have the enzymes needed for its synthesis. Proved food sources of B12 are animal products (meat, fish, dairy products). Some research states that certain non-animal products possibly can be a natural source of B12 because of bacterial symbiosis.

B12 is the largest and most structurally complicated vitamin and can be produced industrially only through a bacterial fermentation-synthesis. This synthetic B12 is used to fortify foods and sold as a dietary supplement.

Vitamin B12 consists of a class of chemically related compounds (vitamers), all of which show pharmacological activity. It contains the biochemically rare element cobalt (chemical symbol Co). The vitamer is produced by bacteria as hydroxocobalamin, but conversion between different forms of the vitamin occurs in the body after consumption

B12 aids in lowering homocysteine levels and may lower the risk of heart disease. 

Recommended daily amount: 2.4 mcg

Example sources: fortified cereals, doenjang and chunggukjang (fermented soybeans), nori (seaweed). 

Fruitarians.net Apple