All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

proteins

  • Amino Acid Requirements for Adults

    Estimates of Amino Acid Requirements for adultsmg / kg per day

    • Phenylalanine + tyrosine: 14
    • Leucine: 14
    • Methionine + cystine13
    • Histidine: 8–12
    • Lysine: 12
    • Isoleucine: 10
    • Valine: 10
    • Threonine: 7
    • Tryptophan: 3.5

  • Protein Deficiency

    Protein deficiency rarely occurs as an isolated condition. It usually accompanies a deficiency of dietary energy and other nutrients resulting from insufficient food intake.

    Deficiency of this severity is very rare in the United States, except as a consequence of pathologic conditions.

    The symptoms are most commonly seen in deprived children in poor countries:

    • stunting,
    • poor musculature,
    • edema,
    • thin and fragile hair,
    • skin lesions
    • hormonal imbalances.

    Edema and loss of muscle mass and hair are the prominent signs in adults. 

  • Phenylalanine Food Sources

    Fruitarian foods high in amino acid phenylalanine, per 100 g (~1/5 lb): 

    • Spirulina, dried - 2777 mg 
    • Soybeans - 2122 mg 
    • Pumpkin or squash seeds - 1642 mg 
    • Peanuts - 1427 mg 
    • Kidney beans - 1370 mg 
    • Lentils, sprouted - 442 mg 
    • Avocados - 260 mg
    • Raisins - 140 mg 
    • Grapefruit - 53mg 
  • Phenylalanine

    Phenylalanine is an essential amino acid.

    Provided by diet, phenylalanine can be converted into another amino acid, tyrosine, in the body. Tyrosine is used to synthesize two key neurotransmitters that promote alertness: dopamine and norepinephrine. 

    It has 3 forms:

    • D-phenylalanine;
    • L-phenylalanine - most common, the form in which phenylalanine is incorporated into the body’s proteins;
    • DL-phenylalanine.

  • All Essential Amino Acids

    An essential amino acid, or indispensable amino acid, is an amino acid that cannot be synthesized by the organism, and must be supplied in diet. 

    The 9 amino acids humans cannot synthesize (F V T W M L I K H):

    • phenylalanine
    • valine
    • threonine
    • tryptophan
    • methionine
    • leucine
    • isoleucine
    • lysine
    • histidine

    Animal and plant proteins are made up of about 20 common amino acids.

    Synthesis of 6 other amino acids - conditionally essential - can be limited under special conditions (R C G Q P Y)arginine, cysteine, glycine, glutamine, proline, and tyrosine.

    Dispensable amino acids can be synthesized in the human body, 5 (A D N E S): alanine, aspartic acid, asparagine, glutamic acid and serine .

  • Amino Acids

    Protein plays a crucial role in almost all biological processes and amino acids are the building blocks of it.

    A large proportion of our cells, muscles and tissue is made up of amino acids - 20% Of the human body is made up of protein. 

    ~500 Amino acids are known, 20 appear in the genetic code, 9 are essential for humans because they cannot be created from other compounds by the human body, and must be taken from food.

    Amino acids carry out many important bodily functions: 

    • give cells their structure;
    • play a key role in the transport and the storage of nutrients;
    • have an influence on the function of organs, glands, tendons and arteries;
    • essential for healing wounds and repairing tissue; 
    • important removal of waste deposits.

  • Nitrogen Balance

    Nitrogen balance is a measure of nitrogen input minus nitrogen output

    Nitrogen Balance = Nitrogen intake - Nitrogen loss

    Nitrogen is a fundamental component of amino acids, which are the molecular building blocks of protein. Measuring nitrogen inputs and losses can be used to study protein metabolism. 

  • Lysine Enhances Gluten

    Lysine was shown to enhance the nutritive value of gluten for humans. 

    The mean nitrogen balance index for gluten was 0.62. For gluten plus lysine, it was significantly higher, 0.76, approaching the value for casein.

  • Gluten is Digestible by Healthy People

    Depending on which measurement system they used, wheat gluten protein was 80-100% digestible by (healthy) humans.

  • Gluten and Other Proteins in Grains

    Based on what is currently known, it's a big leap to attributing autism and other problems to gluten, and an even bigger one to prescribing gluten-free eating as a treatment. It's possible that some people benefit from a gluten-free regimen for reasons that have less to do with gluten and much more to do with the structure involved in planning and sticking to such a strict eating plan.

    In the context of celiac disease, gluten refers to the protein of grains capable of provoking an autoimmune response. Other grains also contain protein, but wheat, barley, rye, and spelt contain varieties that aren't broken down by digestive enzymes:

    • in wheat, the difficult-to-digest protein is gliadin;
    • in rye- secalin; 
    • in barley - hordein.

    In people with celiac disease, when they get absorbed into the walls of the small intestine, the immune system misreads the situation, views them as intruders, and unleashes a furious inflammatory response that damages tissue. 

Isaac Asimov

Never let your sense of morals prevent you from doing what is right.

Nitrogen Balance

Nitrogen balance is a measure of nitrogen input minus nitrogen output

Nitrogen Balance = Nitrogen intake - Nitrogen loss

Nitrogen is a fundamental component of amino acids, which are the molecular building blocks of protein. Measuring nitrogen inputs and losses can be used to study protein metabolism. 

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