All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

prevention

Preventive healthcare (preventive medicine or prophylaxis) consists of measures taken for disease prevention, as opposed to disease treatment. Just as health encompasses a variety of physical and mental states, so do disease and disability, which are affected by environmental factors, genetic predisposition, disease agents, and lifestyle choices. Health, disease, and disability are dynamic processes which begin before individuals realize they are affected. Disease prevention relies on anticipatory actions. 

Each year, millions of people die of preventable deaths. A 2004 study showed that about half of all deaths in the United States in 2000 were due to preventable behaviors and exposures. Leading causes included cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, unintentional injuries, diabetes, and certain infectious diseases. 400,000 people die each year in the United States due to poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle

  • Recommendations for Cancer Prevention from 7,000 Studies

    Recommendations for cancer prevention from the WCRF / AICR:

    1. Be as lean as possible without becoming underweight.
    2. Be physically active for at least 30 minutes every day. Limit sedentary habits.
    3. Avoid sugary drinks. Limit consumption of energy-dense foods.
    4. Eat more of a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes such as beans.
    5. Limit consumption of red meats (such as beef, pork and lamb) and avoid processed meats.
    6. If consumed at all, limit alcoholic drinks to 2 for men and 1 for women a day.
    7. Limit consumption of salty foods and foods processed with salt (sodium).
    8. Don't use supplements to protect against cancer.
  • UN Urges Global Move to Vegan Diet

    United Nations report 2010: A global shift towards a vegan diet is vital to save the world from hunger, fuel poverty, and the worst impacts of climate change.

    Impacts from agriculture are expected to increase substantially due to population growth increasing consumption of animal products. Unlike fossil fuels, it is difficult to look for alternatives: people have to eat. A substantial reduction of impacts would only be possible with a substantial worldwide diet change, away from animal products.

  • American Dietetic Association on Vegetarian Diets

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence, and for athletes.

    ...The results of an evidence-based review showed that a vegetarian diet is associated with a lower risk of death from ischemic heart disease. Vegetarians also appear to have lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and lower rates of hypertension and type 2 diabetes than nonvegetarians. Furthermore, vegetarians tend to have a lower body mass index and lower overall cancer rates. Features of a vegetarian diet that may reduce risk of chronic disease include lower intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol and higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, soy products, fiber, and phytochemicals. The variability of dietary practices among vegetarians makes individual assessment of dietary adequacy essential. In addition to assessing dietary adequacy, food and nutrition professionals can also play key roles in educating vegetarians about sources of specific nutrients, food purchase and preparation, and dietary modifications to meet their needs.

  • More Fruits and Vegetables Is Better

    “Eat more fruits and vegetables” is timeless advice that has the backing of a large body of evidence. Vegetables and fruits provide fiber, slowly digested carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals, and numerous phytonutrients that have been associated with protection against cardiovascular disease, aging-related vision loss due to cataract and macular degeneration, and maintenance of bowel function. The connection between vegetables and fruits and cancer is less well established. Although they do not have a blanket anticancer effect, fruits and vegetables may work against specific cancers, including esophageal, stomach, lung, and colorectal cancer. 

    Fruits and vegetables should be consumed in abundance, which means a minimum of five servings a day—and more is better. As few as 1 in 4 persons in the United States meet this guideline.

    Patrick J. Skerrett, MA, Walter C. Willett

  • Fruit and Non-Communicable Diseases

    Insufficient consumption of fruit and vegetables is associated with an increased risk of non-communicable diseases in the population.

    This study found convincing evidence for combining order of placement in a buffet and separating the fruits and vegetables, as a means to increase the quantity of self-served fruit and vegetables and decrease consumption of other meal components among male university students

    This study demonstrated that a nudge design consisting of changing the placement of F&V to the beginning of the serving sequence, and presenting the F&V components in separated bowls increases the self-served quantity of F&V and simultaneously decreased the quantity of non-F&V components in the intervention group and total energy intake.

  • Fruits and Vegetables for Cataract Prevention

    Dr. Chris Hammond, the chair of ophthalmology at King's College, recommends to increase intake of fruit and vegetables to protect eyes from cataracts:

    "We found no beneficial effect from supplements, only from the vitamin C in the diet".

    The full text of the study "Genetic and Dietary Factors Influencing the Progression of Nuclear Cataract" - see the second link. 

  • Fruit and Blood Pressure, Glucose, Cardiovascular Diseases

    A higher level of fruit consumption was associated with lower blood pressure and blood glucose levels, and with significantly lower risks of major cardiovascular diseases.

  • Fruit for Young Women to Prevent Cancer

    The results of the study, published in The British Medical Journal (BMJ), suggest young women should increase their fruit intake, especially during adolescence, in order to prevent cancer.

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz

We live in the best of all possible worlds.

Plant-Based Diet

A plant-based diet is a diet of any animal (including humans) based on foods derived from plants, including vegetables, whole grains, legumes and fruits, but with few or no animal products

"Plant-based diet" has been used to refer to the following diets:

  • Vegan diet - no food from animal sources.
    • Fruitarian  - consists primarily of fruit.
    • Raw vegan - food is uncooked and sometimes dehydrated.
  • Vegetarian - plant foods, may include eggs and dairy, but no meat.
  • Ovo-lacto vegetarian - includes dairy and eggs.
  • Ovo vegetarian - includes eggs but no dairy. 
  • Lacto vegetarian - includes dairy but no eggs.
  • Pescatarian - diet with eggs, dairy and seafood.
  • Semi-vegetarian - with occasional inclusion of meat.

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