All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Mushrooms

Mushrooms are the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting bodies of a fungus, typically produced above ground on soil, some of which are edible.

  • Fungi

    fungus is any member of the group of eukaryotic organisms that includes unicellular microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as multicellular fungi that produce familiar fruiting forms known as mushrooms. These organisms are classified as a kingdom Fungi, which is separate from the other eukaryotic life kingdoms of plants and animals. Fungi do not use photosynthesis to create energy.

  • Mushrooms

    Edible mushrooms are the fleshy and edible fruit bodies of several species of macrofungi - fungi which bear large fruiting structures - that are either harvested wild or cultivated. 

    Some mushrooms that are edible for most people can cause allergic reactions in some individuals, and old or improperly stored specimens can cause food poisoning. Deadly poisonous mushrooms that are frequently confused with edible mushrooms and cause fatal poisonings. Mushrooms growing in polluted locations can accumulate toxins (e.g. heavy metals).

  • Do Fruitarians Eat Only Sweet Fruits?

    Fruitarian diet is fruit and seeds based, and may include other foods, and not only plants (e.g. algae, mushrooms) - to answer a few recent questions at once.

    Please, do not assume that fruitarianism is eating sweet fruit only. There are many kinds of fruitarians. From those who avoid seeds, if they can, to those who consider honey and eggs to be ethical choices, depending on the circumstances. Usually, fresh fruits are preferable, but the proportion of cooked foods varies. Some fruitarians soak or sprout seeds, some not. Some eat more greens or root/stem vegetables, others prefer botanical fruit, including non-sweet kinds (like tomatoes, cucumbers, squash).

    Most fruitarians have ethical or environmental concerns, some may not, health or performance may be their primary motivation. There are frugans, seasonal fruitarians, freegans, raw vegans or vegetarians with high fruit intake, and so on. Everybody is welcome here :)

    There is no ideal food or method, there is no competition for higher ethics or better health. The idea is to present this topic to more people for an ongoing public discussion and to share knowledge and experience.

Linus Pauling

I have something that I call my Golden Rule. It goes something like this: 'Do unto others twenty-five percent better than you expect them to do unto you.' … The twenty-five percent is for error.

Vitamin A

Retinoids retinol, retinal, and retinoic acid - 3 active forms of vitamin A - "preformed" vitamin A.

Beta carotene can easily be converted to vitamin A by the human body. 

Large amounts of supplemental vitamin A (but not beta carotene) can be harmful to bones.

Vitamin A keeps tissues and skin healthy, plays an important role in bone growth. Diets rich in the carotenoids alpha carotene and lycopene seem to lower lung cancer risk. Carotenoids act as antioxidants. Foods rich in the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin may protect against cataracts. Essential for vision lycopene may lower prostate cancer risk.

Recommended daily amount: 700 mcg - 900 mcg or 3 mg - 6 mg beta-carotene (~ 1 cup of raw cantaloupe or sweet red peppers, or 2 mangoes, or 1/5 of one baked sweet potato). 

Because the body converts all dietary sources of vitamin A into retinol, 1 mcg of physiologically available retinol is equivalent to the following amounts from dietary sources: 1 mcg of retinol, 12 mcg of beta-carotene, and 24 mcg of alpha-carotene or beta-cryptoxanthin. From dietary supplements, the body converts 2 mcg of beta-carotene to 1 mcg of retinol.

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