All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

longevity

Longevity - a long individual life, or great duration of individual life.

  • Vegetarian Diets and Heart Disease

    In comparison with regular meat eaters, mortality from ischemic heart disease was

    • 20% lower in occasional meat eaters,
    • 34% lower in people who ate fish but not meat,
    • 34% lower in lacto-ovo-vegetarians,
    • 26% lower in vegans.

    There were no significant differences between vegetarians and non-vegetarians in mortality from the other causes of death examined.

  • 300 g More Fruits and Vegetables Reduce Risk of Dying

    A combined fruit and vegetable consumption of more than 569 grams per day reduces the risk of mortality by 10% and delays the risk of mortality by 1.12 years compared to a consumption of less than 249 grams per day.

  • B12 in Fermented Korean Vegan Foods and Seaweeds

    Prevalence of vitamin B12 deficient Korean centenarians on the traditional semi-vegetarian was not higher compared with those from Western nations with animal-oriented foods. Screening of vitamin B12 contents has revealed that some traditional soybean-fermented foods, such as Doenjang and Chunggukjang, also Gochujang, Ganjang (soy sauce), cabbage Kimchi, and seaweeds (laver, sea lettuce, sea tangle, sea mustardcontain considerable amounts of vitamin B12. Soybeans (steamed) and tofu do not contain B12. 

    Laver, dried, seasoned & toasted - 55 -71 mcg in 100 g dry weight

    Sea lettuce, raw  -  85 mcg in 100 g dry weight

  • Protein Intake in Older Age

    Respondents aged 50–65 reporting high protein intake had a 75% increase in overall mortality and a 4-fold increase in cancer death risk during the following 18 years. These associations were either abolished or attenuated if the proteins were plant derived.

    Conversely, high protein intake was associated with reduced cancer and overall mortality in respondents over 65, but a 5-fold increase in diabetes mortality across all ages.

  • Vegetables and Fresh and Dry Fruit and Longer Life

    Consumption of vegetables, salad and fresh or dried fruit is robustly associated with decreased mortality.

    A robust inverse association exists between fruit and vegetable consumption and mortality, with benefits seen in up to 7+ portions daily.

  • Fresh Fruits to Live Longer

    To live longer, eat 7+ pieces of fresh fruits or vegetables a day, but not canned or frozen.

    People who ate at least 7 portions of fruit and vegetables each day were 42% less likely to die from any cause.

    It was shown in a recent European study that followed more than 65 thousands participants over 12 years. People with the highest intakes were also 25% less likely to die from cancer and 31% less likely to die from heart disease. Analyzing studies like this, we need to remember that term “vegetables” usually include non-sweet fruits in botanical sense, like tomatoes, bell peppers, cucumbers, eggplants, squashes, and many others. See VegetablesFruits.

    But canned and frozen fruit increased the risk of dying by 17%, and fruit juice was found to have no significant benefit.

    The lead author of this study, Dr. Oyinlola Oyebode of department of epidemiology and public health in UCL, said:

    “The clear message here is that the more fruit and vegetables you eat, the less likely you are to die at any age. My advice would be however much you are eating now, eat more.” 

  • Fruits and Vegetables Can Save Lives and Money

    If Americans ate just one more serving of fruits or vegetables per day, this would save more than 30,000 lives and $5 billion in medical costs each year.

    If Americans were to follow current USDA recommendations for daily consumption of fruits and vegetables, those numbers would go up to more than 127,000 lives and $17 billion saved.

    The increased longevity that would result if Americans ate the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables is worth over $11 trillion.

  • Global Mortality from Noncommunicable Diseases Rose

    Deaths from non-communicable diseases rose by ~ 8 million between 1990 and 2010 - every three deaths worldwide.

    8 million people died from cancer in 2010, 38% more than two decades ago.

    Ischaemic heart disease and stroke collectively killed ~13 million people in 2010 - one in four deaths worldwide, compared with one in five in 1990.

    1.3 Million deaths were due to diabetes, twice as many as in 1990.

  • Plant-Based for Longevity and Against Global Warming

    It was estimated that changes towards more plant-based diets in line with the WHO’s global dietary guidelines could reduce global mortality by 6-10%. Food-related greenhouse gas emissions would be cut by more than two thirds.

Charles Darwin

There is no fundamental difference between man and the higher animals in their mental faculties . . . The lower animals, like man, manifestly feel pleasure and pain, happiness, and misery.

Protein Deficiency

Protein deficiency rarely occurs as an isolated condition. It usually accompanies a deficiency of dietary energy and other nutrients resulting from insufficient food intake.

Deficiency of this severity is very rare in the United States, except as a consequence of pathologic conditions.

The symptoms are most commonly seen in deprived children in poor countries:

  • stunting,
  • poor musculature,
  • edema,
  • thin and fragile hair,
  • skin lesions
  • hormonal imbalances.

Edema and loss of muscle mass and hair are the prominent signs in adults. 

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