All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Fruitarian Interviews

Interesting and remarkable people answer fruitarian questions

For the Fruitarian Interviews project, I have composed 55 questions in 5 sections: Introduction (10), Ethics (30), Lifestyle (5), Diet (5), Conclusions (5). Most of them are ethical questions, not the ethical dilemmas though - I tend to find those a bit too artificial and restrictive. Some questions are hard (for me anyway), sorry for that.

My goal is to gather answers to the same questions from various interesting people, so we all could learn about different perspectives on these topics and gather ideas for our own development and an open discussion.

If you want to participate, please send me your reasons, and follow these instructions upon agreement.

I am very thankful if you have decided to answer the fruitarian interview questions. Please follow these easy steps.

Matt - jAe Costly

This is an interview with Matt - we talked after this interview online live, see the video below (~ 2.5 hours). Matt kindly agreed to answer my questions when I invited him after watching this video (Dear Vegans, Plants DO Feel Pain BUT...) on his channel: 

I Introduction
1. Please, introduce yourself.

Greetings! My name is Matthew. On the internet, I go by either jAe Costly or jack's Afer effort. 

2. How would you describe this stage of your life?

Veganism. 

3. Tell us something about your background.

I grew up in the United States. I have been vegan for over a year. I used to work at a Zoo but I have been studying science education for the past few years. 

Laird Shaw, ethical botanical fruitarian

Laird Shaw from withrespect.net.au has kindly agreed to give me this interview, even though he was considering to limit his online presence - I appreciate it very much. Please, enjoy Laird's in-depth answers to the 55 fruitarian questions.

I Introduction

1. Please, introduce yourself.

I'm a 39 year old vegan-fruitarian guy living in Australia - currently in Sydney, but I own a home in Tasmania. I became lacto-ovo vegetarian around twenty six years ago, vegan around five years ago, and shortly after, vegan-fruitarian (a diet which I describe as "ethical botanical fruitarianism" - more below).

Rhys

This is the fruitarian interview with a very interesting young person, Rhys - Sora Sennin.

Part 1: Introduction

1. Please, introduce yourself.

I'm Rhys Michael. I'm 20 years old, and i'm a CNA.

2. How would you describe this stage of your life?

Hectic and disorganized.

3. Tell us something about your background.

I grew up with a lower middle class family in a dump neighborhood. My parents were democrat and religious but they never imposed that on me.

4. What inspires you in your future?

Honestly, this very questionnaire. The idea that maybe i'll get to meet people who are willing to view vegetation as an organism deserving of its own future.

Subcategories

Linus Pauling

I have something that I call my Golden Rule. It goes something like this: 'Do unto others twenty-five percent better than you expect them to do unto you.' … The twenty-five percent is for error.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C, or L-ascorbic acid, or ascorbate, is an essential nutrient for humans, a water-soluble vitamin. Humans, unlike most animals, are unable to synthesize vitamin C, so it is an essential dietary component. 

  • Vitamin C is required for the biosynthesis of collagen (an essential component of connective tissue), L-carnitine, and certain neurotransmitters, it is also involved in protein metabolism.
  • Vitamin C is also an important physiological antioxidant and has been shown to regenerate other antioxidants within the body, including alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E). Vitamin C regenerates vitamin E by reducing vitamin E radicals formed when vitamin E scavenges the oxygen radicals. 
  • Vitamin C plays an important role in immune function and improves the absorption of nonheme iron, the form of iron present in plant-based foods.

Approximately 70%–90% of vitamin C is absorbed at moderate intakes of 30–180 mg a day. At doses above 1 g a day, absorption falls to less than 50% and absorbed, unmetabolized ascorbic acid is excreted in the urine. 

Insufficient vitamin C intake causes scurvy, which is characterized by fatigue or lassitude, connective tissue weakness, and capillary fragility.

Cells accumulate vitamin C. The total body content of vitamin C ranges from 300 mg (at near scurvy) to about 2 g.

  • High levels of vitamin C are maintained in cells and tissues, and are highest in leukocytes (white blood cells), eyes, adrenal glands, pituitary gland, and brain.
  • Relatively low levels of vitamin C are found in extracellular fluids, such as plasma, red blood cells, and saliva.

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