All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Fruitarian Interviews

Interesting and remarkable people answer fruitarian questions

For the Fruitarian Interviews project, I have composed 55 questions in 5 sections: Introduction (10), Ethics (30), Lifestyle (5), Diet (5), Conclusions (5). Most of them are ethical questions, not the ethical dilemmas though - I tend to find those a bit too artificial and restrictive. Some questions are hard (for me anyway), sorry for that.

My goal is to gather answers to the same questions from various interesting people, so we all could learn about different perspectives on these topics and gather ideas for our own development and an open discussion.

If you want to participate, please send me your reasons, and follow these instructions upon agreement.

I am very thankful if you have decided to answer the fruitarian interview questions. Please follow these easy steps.

Matt - jAe Costly

This is an interview with Matt - we talked after this interview online live, see the video below (~ 2.5 hours). Matt kindly agreed to answer my questions when I invited him after watching this video (Dear Vegans, Plants DO Feel Pain BUT...) on his channel: 

I Introduction
1. Please, introduce yourself.

Greetings! My name is Matthew. On the internet, I go by either jAe Costly or jack's Afer effort. 

2. How would you describe this stage of your life?

Veganism. 

3. Tell us something about your background.

I grew up in the United States. I have been vegan for over a year. I used to work at a Zoo but I have been studying science education for the past few years. 

Laird Shaw, ethical botanical fruitarian

Laird Shaw from withrespect.net.au has kindly agreed to give me this interview, even though he was considering to limit his online presence - I appreciate it very much. Please, enjoy Laird's in-depth answers to the 55 fruitarian questions.

I Introduction

1. Please, introduce yourself.

I'm a 39 year old vegan-fruitarian guy living in Australia - currently in Sydney, but I own a home in Tasmania. I became lacto-ovo vegetarian around twenty six years ago, vegan around five years ago, and shortly after, vegan-fruitarian (a diet which I describe as "ethical botanical fruitarianism" - more below).

Rhys

This is the fruitarian interview with a very interesting young person, Rhys - Sora Sennin.

Part 1: Introduction

1. Please, introduce yourself.

I'm Rhys Michael. I'm 20 years old, and i'm a CNA.

2. How would you describe this stage of your life?

Hectic and disorganized.

3. Tell us something about your background.

I grew up with a lower middle class family in a dump neighborhood. My parents were democrat and religious but they never imposed that on me.

4. What inspires you in your future?

Honestly, this very questionnaire. The idea that maybe i'll get to meet people who are willing to view vegetation as an organism deserving of its own future.

Subcategories

John Ruskin

I will not kill or hurt any living creature needlessly, nor destroy any beautiful thing, but will strive to save and comfort all gentle life, and guard and perfect all natural beauty upon the earth. 

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are the sugars, starches and fibers found in fruits, grains, vegetables and milk products, one of the basic food groups.

Sugar is the generalized name for sweet, short-chain, soluble carbohydrates, many of which are used in food. They are composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Simple sugars are called monosaccharides and include glucose (or dextrose), fructose, and galactose. The table sugar most customarily used as food is sucrose - hydrolyses into fructose and glucose in the body. Other disaccharides include maltose and lactose. Longer chains of sugars are called oligosaccharides. 

Starch is a polymeric carbohydrate consisting of a large number of glucose units joined by glycosidic bonds. This polysaccharide is produced by most green plants as an energy store. It is the most common carbohydrate in human diets and is contained in large amounts in staple foods such as potatoes, wheat, maize (corn), rice. Pure starch is a white, tasteless and odorless powder that is insoluble in cold water or alcohol. 

Fiber is consists of non-starch polysaccharides such as arabinoxylans, cellulose, and many other plant components such as resistant starch, resistant dextrins, inulin, lignin, chitins, pectins, beta-glucans, and oligosaccharides, and are derived from plants. Dietary fibers are not digested by gastrointestinal enzymes. Soluble fiber dissolves in water, changes as it goes through the digestive tract, where it is fermented by bacteria, partially into physiologically active byproducts - healthful compounds. Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water and stays intact as it moves through your digestive system, can be prebiotic and metabolically ferment in the large intestine. Dietary fibers can change absorption of other nutrients and chemicals. Some soluble plant fibers can modulate intestinal inflammation and are contrabiotic. Many types of so-called dietary fiber are not actually fibrous.

Fruitarians.net Apple