All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

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  • Spotting Bad Science by Andy Brunning

    Many of us rely on media that publish scientific research to adjust our nutrition. Here is something to remember, when evaluating it.

    Spotting Bad Science by a chemistry teacher from UK, Andy Brunning - 12 points to help you separate the science from the pseudoscience:
    1. SENSATIONALISED HEADLINES
    2. MISINTERPRETED RESULTS
    3. CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
    4. CORRELATION & CAUSATION
    5. UNSUPPORTED CONCLUSIONS
    6. PROBLEMS WITH SAMPLE SIZE
    7. UNREPRESENTATIVE SAMPLES USED
    8. NO CONTROL GROUP USED
    9. NO BLIND TESTING USED
    10. SELECTIVE REPORTING OF DATA
    11. UNREPLICABLE RESULTS
    12. NON-PEER REVIEWED MATERIAL

Albert Einstein

If people are good only because they fear punishment, then we are a sorry lot indeed. 

Carotenoids

Carotenoids are a class of more than 750 pigments synthesized by plants, algae, and photosynthetic bacteria. These richly colored molecules are the sources of the yellow, orange, and red colors of many plants. Fruit and vegetables provide most of the 40 to 50 carotenoid phytonutrients found in the human diet.

The most common carotenoids in North American diets are α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, and lycopene. 

Provitamin A carotenoids - α-carotene, β-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin - can be converted by the body to retinol (vitamin A), but not lutein, zeaxanthin, and lycopene. 

Dietary lutein and zeaxanthin help maintain optimal visual function - they absorb damaging blue light that enters the eye.

The results of observational studies suggest that diets high in carotenoid-rich fruit and vegetables are associated with reduced risks of cardiovascular disease and some cancers. But high-dose β-carotene supplements did not

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