All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Fruits

Botanical fruits - the seed-bearing structures in flowering plants.

Nuts are the one-seeded, hard-shelled fruit of some plants (e.g. hazelnut).

  • Fruits and Vegetables for Healthy Eyes

    Vision: Eating fruits and vegetables can keep your eyes healthy, and may help prevent common aging-related eye diseases - cataracts and macular degeneration - which afflict millions of Americans over age 65. 

  • Fruits and Vegetables for Healthier Arteries in Later Life

    Women who reported consuming the most fruits and vegetables (8 to 9 servings a day for a 2,000-calorie diet) in their 20s were 40% less likely to have calcified plaque in their arteries in their 40s compared with those who ate the least amount (3 to 4 servings a day) during the same time period.

    This association persisted even after researchers accounted for other lifestyle behaviors, as well as for their current-day diets, further demonstrating the role dietary patterns at younger ages may play.

  • Vegetables and Fresh and Dry Fruit and Longer Life

    Consumption of vegetables, salad and fresh or dried fruit is robustly associated with decreased mortality.

    A robust inverse association exists between fruit and vegetable consumption and mortality, with benefits seen in up to 7+ portions daily.

  • Whole Fruits Prevent Diabetes But Not Juice

    People who ate at least two servings each week of certain whole fruits - particularly blueberries, grapes, and apples - reduced their risk for type 2 diabetes by 23% in comparison to those who ate less than one serving per month.

    Those who consumed one or more servings of fruit juice each day increased their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by as much as 21%.

  • White Fruits Like Apples and Pears Against Stroke

    One big apple or pear a day should reduce your risk of having stroke by 45%, almost by half.

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death in the world. Dutch scientists found that eating fruit and vegetables with white edible portions was associated with a 52% lower stroke risk. Apples and pears were the majority of the fruits consumed in the study, and other foods in the white category were bananas, cauliflower, chicory and cucumber. Each 25 gram per day increase in white fruits and vegetable consumption was associated with a 9% lower risk of stroke.

  • Fresh Fruits to Live Longer

    To live longer, eat 7+ pieces of fresh fruits or vegetables a day, but not canned or frozen.

    People who ate at least 7 portions of fruit and vegetables each day were 42% less likely to die from any cause.

    It was shown in a recent European study that followed more than 65 thousands participants over 12 years. People with the highest intakes were also 25% less likely to die from cancer and 31% less likely to die from heart disease. Analyzing studies like this, we need to remember that term “vegetables” usually include non-sweet fruits in botanical sense, like tomatoes, bell peppers, cucumbers, eggplants, squashes, and many others. See VegetablesFruits.

    But canned and frozen fruit increased the risk of dying by 17%, and fruit juice was found to have no significant benefit.

    The lead author of this study, Dr. Oyinlola Oyebode of department of epidemiology and public health in UCL, said:

    “The clear message here is that the more fruit and vegetables you eat, the less likely you are to die at any age. My advice would be however much you are eating now, eat more.” 

  • Children Want to Eat Fruits and Vegetables

    Little kids (3-5) who learned about fruits and vegetables were more likely to identify them as healthy and want to eat them.

  • Fresh Fruit Against Cardiovascular Diseases

    The more fresh fruit people ate, the more their risk of cardiovascular disease declined, including stroke.

    Those who ate fruit daily cut their heart disease risks by 25-40%, and cut their overall risk of death by 32%.

  • Humans Share Genes with Plants and Animals

    Humans share ~ 24% of genes with grapes, ~ 85% - with cows.

    All animals, plants, and fungi share an ancestor that lived about 1.6 billion years ago. Every lineage that descended from that progenitor retains parts of its original genome, embodying one of evolution’s key principles: If it’s not broke, don’t fix it

  • Green, Blue, Grey Water Footprints and Animal Agriculture

    3 Water footprints:

    Green water footprint is water from precipitation that is stored in the root zone of the soil and evaporated, transpired or incorporated by plants. It is particularly relevant for agricultural, horticultural and forestry products.

    Bluewater footprint is water that has been sourced from surface or groundwater resources and is either evaporated, incorporated into a product or taken from one body of water and returned to another, or returned at a different time.

    Grey water footprint is the amount of fresh water required to assimilate pollutants to meet specific water quality standards. The grey water footprint considers point-source pollution discharged to a freshwater resource directly through a pipe or indirectly through runoff or leaching from the soil, impervious surfaces, or other diffuse sources. 

    Fruits and Legumes vs Meat Green, Blue and Grey Water Footprint Comparison

    Water footprint per ton (m3 / ton) and per unit of nutritional value for fruits, pulses (legumes like beans, peanuts) and bovine meat*:   

    Food

    Green Water 
    footprint per ton
    (m3 / ton)

    Blue Water
    footprint per ton
    (m3 / ton)

    Grey Water
    footprint per ton
    (m3 / ton)

    Total Water

    Calorie

    litre/kcal

    Protein

    litre/g

    Fruits 726 147 89 962 2.09 180
    Legumes 3 180 141 734 4 055 1.19 19
    Meat 14 414 550 451 15 415 10.19 112

    * This table made by the author of the site Fruitarians.net (Lena), based on THE GREEN, BLUE AND GREY WATER FOOTPRINT OF FARM ANIMALS AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS, VOLUME 1: MAIN REPORT, M.M. MEKONNEN, A.Y. HOEKSTRA, DECEMBER 2010, VALUE OF WATER RESEARCH REPORT SERIES NO. 48, the link to PDF is provided on the article page.

    Study Conclusions 

    (UNESCO-IHE, Institute for Water Education, 2010)

    As a general picture we find that animal products have a larger water footprint per ton of product than crop products.

    ... The global average water footprint per ton of crop increases from sugar crops (roughly 200 m3 /ton) and vegetables (~300 m3 /ton) to pulses [legumes] (~4000 m3 /ton) and nuts (~9000 m3 /ton). For animal products, the water footprint increases from milk (~1000 m3 /ton) and egg (~3300 m3 /ton) to beef (~15400 m3 /ton).

    Also when viewed from a caloric standpoint, the water footprint of animal products is larger than for crop products. The average water footprint per calorie for beef is twenty times larger than for cereals and starchy roots.

    ... The water footprint per gram of protein for milk, eggs and chicken meat is about 1.5 times larger than for pulses. For beef, the water footprint per gram of protein is 6 times larger than for pulses.

    ... The general conclusion is that from a freshwater resource perspective, it is more efficient to obtain calories, protein and fat through crop products than animal products. 

    ... A vegetarian diet compared with the average current per capita food intake in the USA can reduce the water footprint of an individual by as much as 58%

John Stuart Mill

A person may cause evil to others not only by his actions but by his inaction, and in either case he is justly accountable to them for the injury.

Vitamin B1 Thiamine

Vitamin B1 (Thiamin, Thiamine) is one of 8 B vitamins, the first B vitamin discovered. All B vitamins help the body convert carbohydrates into glucose, which the body uses to produce energy, B-complex vitamins also help the body metabolize fats and protein. All B vitamins are water soluble.

All living organisms use thiamine, but it is synthesized only in bacteria, fungi, and plants. Animals must obtain it from their diet, therefore for humans it is an essential nutrient.  Your body needs it to form adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which every cell of the body uses for energy.

B1 helps convert food into energy, needed for healthy skin, hair, muscles, and brain. 

Thiamine deficiency has a potentially fatal outcome if it remains untreated. In less-severe cases, nonspecific signs include malaise, weight loss, irritability and confusion.

Recommended daily amount: 1.1 - 1.2 mg (~ 50 g of flaxseeds, or sesame tahini, or 100 g pine or sunflower seeds, or corn flour).

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