All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Notes: current

It has been seven years since I tried to find researches or philosophers who might be interested in fruitarianism. Back then I have joined ResearchGate.net but nobody seemed to be involved into anything close to fruitarian diet or ethics. I left this note on my profile (researchgate.net/profile/Lena_Nechet):

Hi, I have joined this site for scientist (not being one myself) to find someone who is interested in researching nutritional aspect of fruitarianism. I hoped someone would be interested in a case study. I gave up, maybe too early. I'll keep this profile for the history, without participation, but you are welcome to contact me directly - thank you!

I am not as eager anymore to offer my time for this purpose, but I will definitely consider serious offers.

George Berkeley

If a tree falls in the forest and no one is there to hear it, does it make a sound?

Carotenoids

Carotenoids are a class of more than 750 pigments synthesized by plants, algae, and photosynthetic bacteria. These richly colored molecules are the sources of the yellow, orange, and red colors of many plants. Fruit and vegetables provide most of the 40 to 50 carotenoid phytonutrients found in the human diet.

The most common carotenoids in North American diets are α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, and lycopene. 

Provitamin A carotenoids - α-carotene, β-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin - can be converted by the body to retinol (vitamin A), but not lutein, zeaxanthin, and lycopene. 

Dietary lutein and zeaxanthin help maintain optimal visual function - they absorb damaging blue light that enters the eye.

The results of observational studies suggest that diets high in carotenoid-rich fruit and vegetables are associated with reduced risks of cardiovascular disease and some cancers. But high-dose β-carotene supplements did not

Fruitarians.net Apple