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Short knowledge summaries, facts and citations, related to fruitarianism from scientific internet publications, mass media and other seemingly credible online sources, with links

Vegetarian diets do not contain meat, poultry or fish, vegan diets further exclude dairy products and eggs. Vegetarian and vegan diets can vary widely.

In general, vegetarian diets provide relatively large amounts of cereals, pulses, nuts, fruits and vegetables.

In terms of nutrients, vegetarian diets are usually

  • rich in carbohydrates, n-6 fatty acids, dietary fibre, carotenoids, folic acid, vitamin C, vitamin E and Mg,
  • relatively low in protein, saturated fat, long-chain n-3 fatty acids, retinol, vitamin B12, zinc (Zn),
  • vegans may have particularly low intakes of vitamin B12 and low intakes of Ca.

On average, vegetarians and vegans have a relatively low BMI and a low plasma cholesterol concentration, but higher plasma homocysteine concentrations than in non-vegetarians. Overall, the data suggest that the health of Western vegetarians is good and similar to that of comparable non-vegetarians.

In comparison with regular meat eaters, mortality from ischemic heart disease was

  • 20% lower in occasional meat eaters,
  • 34% lower in people who ate fish but not meat,
  • 34% lower in lacto-ovo-vegetarians,
  • 26% lower in vegans.

There were no significant differences between vegetarians and non-vegetarians in mortality from the other causes of death examined.

When properly cleaned, separated, cooked, and stored to limit contamination, fruits and vegetables safely provide essential nutrients.

Among foodborne illnesses, leafy vegetables accounted for the most of them. Many of those illnesses (46%) were caused by norovirus.

A combination of four animal food categories: beef, game, pork, and poultry accounted for fewer illnesses, but for 29% of deaths. 

Each year ~ 48 million people (1 in 6) get sick from food eaten in the United States. 

History of Plant Studies: 

In the centuries following the time of Aristotle and his students, who made the first philosophical attempts to understand plants in their complexity, interest in herb plants was limited mainly to their medical usage. This changed in the sixteenth century when the first biological attempts were done to understand the basic principles of structure and function of plants. At first, studies were largely devoted to plant distribution, taxonomy, and morphology. Later, taking the lead from medicine, anatomy and cytology of plants were added to the curriculum of plant sciences, as studied in the early universities.

In fact, the cellular nature of living organisms was first elaborated using plants (Hooke 1665). By the end of the 19th century, it was realised that plants were even more similar to animals than had been thought hitherto.

  • For their reproduction, plants use identical sexual processes.
  • Plants attacked by pathogens develop immunity, using the corresponding processes and mechanisms in animals.
  • Both animals and plants use the same molecules and pathways to drive their circadian rhythms.

Critical mass of new data has been accumulated, culminating in the emergence of plant neurobiology.

Plants are intelligent organisms, which perform complex information processing. The word "neuron" was taken by animal neurobiologists from Greek where the original meaning of this word is vegetal fibre.

Auxin emerges as a plant-specific neurotransmitter. Roots are specialized not only for the uptake of nutrients, but also seem to support neuronal-like activities based on plant synapses. Vascular elements allow the rapid spread of hydraulic signals and action potentials, resembling nerves. Plants are capable of learning and make decisions about their future activities according to the actual environmental conditions. It is obvious that they possess a complex apparatus for the storage and processing of information.

The World Health Organization’s drinking water quality Guideline Value for fluoride is 1.5 mg / litre (WHO, 1993).

WHO emphasises that in setting national standards for fluoride it is particularly important to consider climatic conditions, volumes of water intake, and intake of fluoride from other sources (e.g. food and air).

Aggregated definitions of terms used on Fruitarian's Network. A definition is a statement of the meaning of a term - a word, a phrase, or a set of other symbols.

Relevant quotes - statements and thoughts relevant to fruitarianism by various people.

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