All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

In animals, a tumor develops when a cell (or group of cells) loses the built-in controls that regulate its growth, often as a result of mutations. Plants can experience the same phenomenon, along with cancerous masses, but it tends to be brought on via infection. Fungi, bacteria, viruses, and insect infestation have all been tied to plant cancers. Oak trees, for example, often grow tumors that double as homes for larvae.

The good news for plants is that even though they’re susceptible to cancer, they’re less vulnerable to its effects. For one thing, a vegetable tumor won’t metastasize. That’s because plant cells are typically locked in place by a matrix of rigid cell walls, so they can’t migrate. Even when a plant cell begins dividing uncontrollably, the tumor it creates remains stuck in one place usually with minor effects on the plant’s health—like a burl in a redwood tree.

Plants also have the benefit of lacking any vital organs.

Elliot Meyerowitz, a plant geneticist at the California Institute of Technology:

“It’s bad to get a brain tumor if you’re a human, but there’s nothing that you can name that’s bad to get a tumor in if you’re a plant. Because whatever it is, you can make another.”

New Comments

  • Dear Lena, I am so impressed by your goals. Please let me know how I can help. If I have read the ...

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  • Thank you! I prefer breaststroke for many reasons. I wish I had a lake to swim :)

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  • Damn - You did 6K !!! That's huge. I could turn you into a 10K lake swimmer ! :-)

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  • Hey, saw your lap-swimming page for the first time! A 1650 is a good distance for a non-competitive swimmer!

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  • Hi Lena, I respect that we all have a different opinion on the definition of the word fruitarian ...

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  • 30 year fruitarian, overcame mucho health problem. Eat like a gorilla and kick butt!! Everyone ...

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Carl Sagan

A sharp distinction between humans and “animals” is essential if we are to bend them to our will, make them work for us, wear them, eat them–without any disquieting tinges of guilt or regret. It is unseemly of us, who often behave so unfeeling toward other animals, to contend that only humans can suffer. The behavior of other animals renders such pretensions specious. They are just too much like us.

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