All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

exercise

  • Nishi Shiki - Nishi Health System by Katsuzo Nishi

    Nishi Shiki was invented in 1927 by Katsuzō Nishi, the chief engineer for the Tokyo subway and an aikido teacher.

    Most of my life I followed the first four rules every day, and substituted the rest with yoga asanas. 

  • Swimming in the Pacific Ocean 3.5K

    Swimming in the Pacific Ocean 3.5K

    Today I did one of my longest swims in open waters: over 3.5 km (3.5K), not counting curves, waves, zigzag swimming to avoid kelp, kayakers, fishermen, birds, and even one big seal.

    This is my 3rd consecutive day swimming in the ocean, ~ 2 km (2K), ~ 2.7 km (2.7K) in two previous days, plus brisk walks up and down the hills (~ 110 m slope) 5 km (5K), 7 km (7K), and 10km (10K) today. Earlier this Summer I swam 3-4 times a week, but not regularly.

  • Swimming in Outdoor Pool

    Swimming in Outdoor Pool

    This September I swam more in a pool then in the ocean! Having a month-ticket to a nice neighboring pool makes it easier, and there was too much seaweed along the coast this year after the first hot weeks of Fall. 

    In the pool I used to make around 60 short lengths (25 yards) first, but then my friend pro-swimmer suggested I should do 66 (one mile, or 1650 yards, or 1.5 kilometres), and I switch to a swimmer's mile a day. I turn like I do in open waters, barely touching the walls and it takes me the whole 45 minutes of non-stop breaststroke to finish :) You may laugh about it, but for somebody whose main sport in youth was piano I am doing pretty nicely.

  • Lucky Sun Hours

    Unexpectedly, the Sun went out, and I was happy all the way to the pool, in it, and back.

    7K Walking (total), 1.5K swimming.

    This is me, Lena, in the bright Californian sunlight after a swim.

  • After a Swim

    This is me on the way back from pool after swimming. This is me, Lena, after the usual 1.5K  swim.

    I've been swimming in an open pool for many weeks now, almost every day, almost the same distance - 1.5 kilometers.

  • Thermic Effect of Food and Negative Calories

    Thermic effect of food (TEF) is the amount of energy expenditure above the resting metabolic rate due to the cost of processing food for use and storage. The effect varies substantially for different food components. The mechanism is unknown.

    A commonly used estimate of the thermic effect of food is about 10% of one's caloric intake. 

    The primary determinants of daily thermic effect are: 

    1. the total caloric content of the meals,
    2. the macronutrient composition of the meals ingested.

    Macronutrients:

    The thermic effect of food is the energy required for digestion, absorption, and disposal of ingested nutrients, and depends on the composition of the food consumed:

    • Protein: 20-35 % of the energy consumed,
    • Carbohydratesand fats5-15 %.

    Meal frequency has little to no thermic effect. 

    Insulin

    Thermic effect also depends on the insulin sensitivity of the individual, with more insulin-sensitive individuals having a significant effect while individuals with increasing resistance have negligible to zero effects. Both insulin resistance and obesity are independently associated with impaired thermic effect of food at rest, but "the responsiveness of thermogenesis to exercise before a meal is related to the obese state and not independently to insulin resistance per se."

    Exercise

    The thermic effect of food is marginally increased by 7-8 calories per hour with exercise:

    • aerobic training of sufficient duration and intensity
    • and by anaerobic weight training.

    "Negative"  Caloric Balance

    Celery, grapefruit, lemon, lime, apple, lettuce, broccoli, and cabbage are often claimed to have negative caloric balance, requiring more energy to digest than recovered from the food. There is no scientific evidence to show that any of these foods have a negative caloric impact.

  • Vitamin C in Muscles

    The study has shown that skeletal muscle is very sensitive to changes in vitamin C intake, and that the vitamin C content in muscle will fall if intake decreases below optimal levels. This is likely to affect muscle function. Muscle is the largest store of vitamin C in our bodies.

    Professor Margreet Vissers, from the Centre for Free Radical Research:

    Many people think that all fruit and vegetables are equally able to supply vitamin C, but this is not the case. The levels in food vary hugely across the spectrum. We should eat a good range daily, but because many fruit contain only one tenth of a healthy daily vitamin C requirement, we would recommend at least one serve per day of a high-value food like kiwifruit. This will help you easily reach an optimal vitamin C intake, as well as delivering other vital nutrients.

    There is, however, considerable debate regarding the beneficial health effects of vitamin C supplementation. The administration of vitamin C may significantly hamper endurance capacity. Vitamin C supplementation decreases training efficiency because it prevents some cellular adaptations to exercise.

  • Overnutrition

    Overnutrition, a type of malnutrition, is emerging with rates of obesity and related chronic diseases associated with urbanisation, aging populations, technological development and globalisation of food supplies and industry. Billions of dollars are spent annually by the food industry to promote the consumption of highly refined, high-calorie foods with little or no nutritional value. 

    At least 35 million overweight children are living in developing countries and 8 million in developed countries. Children are increasingly exposed to high-fat, high-sugar, high-salt, energy-dense, micronutrient-poor foods which tend to be cheaper than healthy foods. General imbalance in energy intake compared to physical activity levels is driving the obesity epidemic. In industrialised countries, child obesity risk is associated with lower household income, women with less education, and single parent households.

    Obesity is increasingly prevalent among adolescent girls and women, as access to a greater quantity of inexpensive, tasty, and convenient foods increases. 

    Taxation on high-calorie, low-nutrition foods can play a significant role in reducing the consumption of such products. Population-wide weight-control campaigns that raise awareness among medical staff, policy-makers and the public at large can also help to reduce obesity. Particularly important is the promotion of health literacy. Additional measures include restrictions on the marketing of unhealthy foods and sugary drinks to children, and controls on the use of misleading health and nutrition claims; mandatory front-of-pack food labelling helps consumers to identify healthier options. 

  • Tarahumara Runners on Corn and Beans Diet

    The Rarámuri or Tarahumara are a Native American people of northwestern Mexico who are renowned for their long-distance running ability. Rarámuri, means "runners on foot" or "those who run fast". Staple crops are corn and beans.

    Frugan (fruitarian) runners Tarahumara were described by Ruth Heidrich, Ph.D., a runner for 36 years and vegan for 21 years, who won over 800 age-group first place trophies in runs, triathlons, biathlons, and track and field, and completed the Ironman Triathlon 6 times, run 67 marathons, and holds a number of fitness records, following a diet similar to the Tarahumara:

    "...Their only food is tesguino, milled corn mixed with water to a drinkable consistency. This is the mainstay (75%) of Tarahumara diet, with the remaining food being beans and squash. They also take the milled corn as their sole food when traveling, since it is lightweight, doesn't spoil, and is easily prepared by mixing it with water in a half gourd they carry with them. This gives them great stamina and, more importantly, none of them appeared to be protein or calcium deficient with this plant-based diet."

    The Tarahumara runners are legendary for their 24-, 36-, even 72-hour long runs. In the Leadville 100-miler in 1991, the Tarahumara took first, second, and fourth places. 

  • Diet of Champion Meagan Duhamel

    Canadian champion figure skater Meagan Duhamel, an olympian medalist:

    Well, I eat an entirely plant-based diet. 

    I believe in a whole-foods diet filled with fruits, vegetables, whole grains, ancient grains, proteins and healthy fatty acids. Green vegetables, chia seeds, hemp seeds, flax seeds, ancient grains, avocado, quinoa, tempeh, beans and fruits are a main source of fuel.

Charles Darwin

There is no fundamental difference between man and the higher animals in their mental faculties . . . The lower animals, like man, manifestly feel pleasure and pain, happiness, and misery.

Mushrooms

Edible mushrooms are the fleshy and edible fruit bodies of several species of macrofungi - fungi which bear large fruiting structures - that are either harvested wild or cultivated. 

Some mushrooms that are edible for most people can cause allergic reactions in some individuals, and old or improperly stored specimens can cause food poisoning. Deadly poisonous mushrooms that are frequently confused with edible mushrooms and cause fatal poisonings. Mushrooms growing in polluted locations can accumulate toxins (e.g. heavy metals).

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