All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Diet

Diet - providing or obtaining the food necessary for health and growth, choice of nutrition.

  • Vegan Diet Can Lower Risk of Cancer

    Vegan diet seems to confer lower risk for overall and female-specific cancer than other diets.

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Dietary factors account for at least 30% of all cancers in Western countries. 

  • Do Fruitarians Eat Only Sweet Fruits?

    Fruitarian diet is fruit and seeds based, and may include other foods, and not only plants (e.g. algae, mushrooms) - to answer a few recent questions at once.

    Please, do not assume that fruitarianism is eating sweet fruit only. There are many kinds of fruitarians. From those who avoid seeds, if they can, to those who consider honey and eggs to be ethical choices, depending on the circumstances. Usually, fresh fruits are preferable, but the proportion of cooked foods varies. Some fruitarians soak or sprout seeds, some not. Some eat more greens or root/stem vegetables, others prefer botanical fruit, including non-sweet kinds (like tomatoes, cucumbers, squash).

    Most fruitarians have ethical or environmental concerns, some may not, health or performance may be their primary motivation. There are frugans, seasonal fruitarians, freegans, raw vegans or vegetarians with high fruit intake, and so on. Everybody is welcome here :)

    There is no ideal food or method, there is no competition for higher ethics or better health. The idea is to present this topic to more people for an ongoing public discussion and to share knowledge and experience.

  • Fruits and Vegetables at Young Age and Arteries

    Those who ate the most fruits and vegetables as young adults were 26 percent less likely to have calcified plaque in their arteries than those who ate the least. This plaque is associated with hardening of the arteries, which increases the risk of heart disease.

  • WHO on Protein and Amino Acid Requirements

    Protein Requirement Recommendation

    The requirement indicated by the meta-analysis (a median requirement of 105 mg nitrogen/kg per day or 0.66 g/kg per day of protein) can be accepted as the best estimate of a population average requirement for healthy adults.

    General recommendation

    For adults, the protein requirement per kg body weight is considered to be the same for both sexes, at all ages, and for all body weights within the acceptable range. The value accepted for the safe level of intake is 0.83 g/kg per day, for proteins with a protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score value of 1.0. No safe upper limit has been identified... (p. 242)

    Range Body weight Safe level of protein intake (score 1.0)
    From 40 kg 33 g per day
    To 80 kg 66 gper day
  • UN Urges Global Move to Vegan Diet

    United Nations report 2010: A global shift towards a vegan diet is vital to save the world from hunger, fuel poverty, and the worst impacts of climate change.

    Impacts from agriculture are expected to increase substantially due to population growth increasing consumption of animal products. Unlike fossil fuels, it is difficult to look for alternatives: people have to eat. A substantial reduction of impacts would only be possible with a substantial worldwide diet change, away from animal products.

  • American Dietetic Association on Vegetarian Diets

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence, and for athletes.

    ...The results of an evidence-based review showed that a vegetarian diet is associated with a lower risk of death from ischemic heart disease. Vegetarians also appear to have lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and lower rates of hypertension and type 2 diabetes than nonvegetarians. Furthermore, vegetarians tend to have a lower body mass index and lower overall cancer rates. Features of a vegetarian diet that may reduce risk of chronic disease include lower intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol and higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, soy products, fiber, and phytochemicals. The variability of dietary practices among vegetarians makes individual assessment of dietary adequacy essential. In addition to assessing dietary adequacy, food and nutrition professionals can also play key roles in educating vegetarians about sources of specific nutrients, food purchase and preparation, and dietary modifications to meet their needs.

  • Fruit and Non-Communicable Diseases

    Insufficient consumption of fruit and vegetables is associated with an increased risk of non-communicable diseases in the population.

    This study found convincing evidence for combining order of placement in a buffet and separating the fruits and vegetables, as a means to increase the quantity of self-served fruit and vegetables and decrease consumption of other meal components among male university students

    This study demonstrated that a nudge design consisting of changing the placement of F&V to the beginning of the serving sequence, and presenting the F&V components in separated bowls increases the self-served quantity of F&V and simultaneously decreased the quantity of non-F&V components in the intervention group and total energy intake.

  • Plant-Based for Longevity and Against Global Warming

    It was estimated that changes towards more plant-based diets in line with the WHO’s global dietary guidelines could reduce global mortality by 6-10%. Food-related greenhouse gas emissions would be cut by more than two thirds.

  • Lean Meat is Not Pure Protein

    "Lean meat" is a misleading term. I noticed many times in conversations that people who think that they eat "proteins" tend to think about this food group as an almost pure protein, a perfect set of essential amino acids. Especially if they consume so called "lean meats." 

    In beef (presented as "90% lean meat") - half of the calories are from fat (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/beef-products/6193/2). Even in the leanest bird meat approximately the fifth of the energy is from fat, ~18% in the leanest I could find (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/poultry-products/704/2).

    Digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of protein in beef is only 0.92, chicken - 0.91(?), and egg whites and soy - 1 or 100% (not that it matters much). Note, that 62% of calories in a whole egg are from fat, and 40% in soybeans. 

  • Vegetable Diet and LDL Cholesterol

    Compared with the starch-based and low-fat diets, the high-fiber vegetable diet resulted in the largest reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL, the "bad" kind) cholesterol.

Charles Darwin

There is no fundamental difference between man and the higher animals in their mental faculties . . . The lower animals, like man, manifestly feel pleasure and pain, happiness, and misery.

Trees

 A tree is a plant with an elongated stem, or trunk, supporting branches and leaves in most species. Trees tend to be long-lived, some reaching several thousand years old. Trees have been in existence for 370 million years.

A variety of plant species have independently evolved a woody trunk and branches to compete for sunlight. In more general sense, tall palms, tree ferns, bananas and bamboos are also trees. The roots branch out under the ground to anchor the tree and to extract moisture and nutrients from the soil. Above ground, the branches usually bear leaves, which capture light. 

Trees reduce erosion and moderate the climate. Trees and forests provide a habitat for many species of animals and plants. Some trees provide edible fruit

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