All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Diet

Diet - providing or obtaining the food necessary for health and growth, choice of nutrition.

  • Meat Diet and Global Warming

    A typical meat-eater’s diet is responsible for almost twice as much global warming as vegetarian’s and almost triple that of a vegan. The Oxford University study suggested that cutting your meat intake in half could cut your carbon footprint by more than 35%.

  • Beta-Carotene Supplements and Cancer

    Plant foods have an important preventive influence in a population at high risk for lung cancer. However, persons who use beta-carotene supplements do not benefit from the protective compounds in plant foods.

  • 5 Main Elements of Healthy Diet by WHO

    From World Health Organization - 5 elements of a healthy diet:

    1) Fruits, vegetables, legumes (e.g. lentils, beans), nuts and whole grains (e.g. unprocessed maize, millet, oats, wheat, brown rice).

    2) At least 400 g (5 portions) of fruits and vegetables a day. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, cassava and other starchy roots are not classified as fruits or vegetables.

    3) Less than 10% of total energy intake from free sugars, which is equivalent to 50 g (or around 12 level teaspoons) for a person of healthy body weight consuming approximately 2000 calories per day, but ideally less than 5% of total energy intake for additional health benefits. Most free sugars are added to foods or drinks by the manufacturer, cook or consumer, and can also be found in sugars naturally present in honey, syrups, fruit juices and fruit juice concentrates.

    4) Less than 30% of total energy intake from fats. Unsaturated fats (e.g. found in fish, avocado, nuts, sunflower, canola and olive oils) are preferable to saturated fats (e.g. found in fatty meat, butter, palm and coconut oil, cream, cheese, ghee and lard). Industrial trans fats (found in processed food, fast food, snack food, fried food, frozen pizza, pies, cookies, margarines and spreads) are not part of a healthy diet.

    5) Less than 5 g of salt (equivalent to approximately 1 teaspoon) per day and use iodized salt.

  • Vegan Diet Can Lower Risk of Cancer

    Vegan diet seems to confer lower risk for overall and female-specific cancer than other diets.

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Dietary factors account for at least 30% of all cancers in Western countries. 

  • Do Fruitarians Eat Only Sweet Fruits?

    Fruitarian diet is fruit and seeds based, and may include other foods, and not only plants (e.g. algae, mushrooms) - to answer a few recent questions at once.

    Please, do not assume that fruitarianism is eating sweet fruit only. There are many kinds of fruitarians. From those who avoid seeds, if they can, to those who consider honey and eggs to be ethical choices, depending on the circumstances. Usually, fresh fruits are preferable, but the proportion of cooked foods varies. Some fruitarians soak or sprout seeds, some not. Some eat more greens or root/stem vegetables, others prefer botanical fruit, including non-sweet kinds (like tomatoes, cucumbers, squash).

    Most fruitarians have ethical or environmental concerns, some may not, health or performance may be their primary motivation. There are frugans, seasonal fruitarians, freegans, raw vegans or vegetarians with high fruit intake, and so on. Everybody is welcome here :)

    There is no ideal food or method, there is no competition for higher ethics or better health. The idea is to present this topic to more people for an ongoing public discussion and to share knowledge and experience.

  • Fruits and Vegetables at Young Age and Arteries

    Those who ate the most fruits and vegetables as young adults were 26 percent less likely to have calcified plaque in their arteries than those who ate the least. This plaque is associated with hardening of the arteries, which increases the risk of heart disease.

  • WHO on Protein and Amino Acid Requirements

    Protein Requirement Recommendation

    The requirement indicated by the meta-analysis (a median requirement of 105 mg nitrogen/kg per day or 0.66 g/kg per day of protein) can be accepted as the best estimate of a population average requirement for healthy adults.

    General recommendation

    For adults, the protein requirement per kg body weight is considered to be the same for both sexes, at all ages, and for all body weights within the acceptable range. The value accepted for the safe level of intake is 0.83 g/kg per day, for proteins with a protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score value of 1.0. No safe upper limit has been identified... (p. 242)

    Range Body weight Safe level of protein intake (score 1.0)
    From 40 kg 33 g per day
    To 80 kg 66 gper day
  • UN Urges Global Move to Vegan Diet

    United Nations report 2010: A global shift towards a vegan diet is vital to save the world from hunger, fuel poverty, and the worst impacts of climate change.

    Impacts from agriculture are expected to increase substantially due to population growth increasing consumption of animal products. Unlike fossil fuels, it is difficult to look for alternatives: people have to eat. A substantial reduction of impacts would only be possible with a substantial worldwide diet change, away from animal products.

  • American Dietetic Association on Vegetarian Diets

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence, and for athletes.

    ...The results of an evidence-based review showed that a vegetarian diet is associated with a lower risk of death from ischemic heart disease. Vegetarians also appear to have lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and lower rates of hypertension and type 2 diabetes than nonvegetarians. Furthermore, vegetarians tend to have a lower body mass index and lower overall cancer rates. Features of a vegetarian diet that may reduce risk of chronic disease include lower intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol and higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, soy products, fiber, and phytochemicals. The variability of dietary practices among vegetarians makes individual assessment of dietary adequacy essential. In addition to assessing dietary adequacy, food and nutrition professionals can also play key roles in educating vegetarians about sources of specific nutrients, food purchase and preparation, and dietary modifications to meet their needs.

  • Fruit and Non-Communicable Diseases

    Insufficient consumption of fruit and vegetables is associated with an increased risk of non-communicable diseases in the population.

    This study found convincing evidence for combining order of placement in a buffet and separating the fruits and vegetables, as a means to increase the quantity of self-served fruit and vegetables and decrease consumption of other meal components among male university students

    This study demonstrated that a nudge design consisting of changing the placement of F&V to the beginning of the serving sequence, and presenting the F&V components in separated bowls increases the self-served quantity of F&V and simultaneously decreased the quantity of non-F&V components in the intervention group and total energy intake.

Plutarch

But for the sake of some little mouthful of flesh we deprive a soul of the sun and light, and of that proportion of life and time it had been born into the world to enjoy.

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are the sugars, starches and fibers found in fruits, grains, vegetables and milk products, one of the basic food groups.

Sugar is the generalized name for sweet, short-chain, soluble carbohydrates, many of which are used in food. They are composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Simple sugars are called monosaccharides and include glucose (or dextrose), fructose, and galactose. The table sugar most customarily used as food is sucrose - hydrolyses into fructose and glucose in the body. Other disaccharides include maltose and lactose. Longer chains of sugars are called oligosaccharides. 

Starch is a polymeric carbohydrate consisting of a large number of glucose units joined by glycosidic bonds. This polysaccharide is produced by most green plants as an energy store. It is the most common carbohydrate in human diets and is contained in large amounts in staple foods such as potatoes, wheat, maize (corn), rice. Pure starch is a white, tasteless and odorless powder that is insoluble in cold water or alcohol. 

Fiber is consists of non-starch polysaccharides such as arabinoxylans, cellulose, and many other plant components such as resistant starch, resistant dextrins, inulin, lignin, chitins, pectins, beta-glucans, and oligosaccharides, and are derived from plants. Dietary fibers are not digested by gastrointestinal enzymes. Soluble fiber dissolves in water, changes as it goes through the digestive tract, where it is fermented by bacteria, partially into physiologically active byproducts - healthful compounds. Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water and stays intact as it moves through your digestive system, can be prebiotic and metabolically ferment in the large intestine. Dietary fibers can change absorption of other nutrients and chemicals. Some soluble plant fibers can modulate intestinal inflammation and are contrabiotic. Many types of so-called dietary fiber are not actually fibrous.

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