All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Diet

Diet - providing or obtaining the food necessary for health and growth, choice of nutrition.

  • Green, Blue, Grey Water Footprints and Animal Agriculture

    3 Water footprints:

    Green water footprint is water from precipitation that is stored in the root zone of the soil and evaporated, transpired or incorporated by plants. It is particularly relevant for agricultural, horticultural and forestry products.

    Bluewater footprint is water that has been sourced from surface or groundwater resources and is either evaporated, incorporated into a product or taken from one body of water and returned to another, or returned at a different time.

    Grey water footprint is the amount of fresh water required to assimilate pollutants to meet specific water quality standards. The grey water footprint considers point-source pollution discharged to a freshwater resource directly through a pipe or indirectly through runoff or leaching from the soil, impervious surfaces, or other diffuse sources. 

    Fruits and Legumes vs Meat Green, Blue and Grey Water Footprint Comparison

    Water footprint per ton (m3 / ton) and per unit of nutritional value for fruits, pulses (legumes like beans, peanuts) and bovine meat*:   

    Food

    Green Water 
    footprint per ton
    (m3 / ton)

    Blue Water
    footprint per ton
    (m3 / ton)

    Grey Water
    footprint per ton
    (m3 / ton)

    Total Water

    Calorie

    litre/kcal

    Protein

    litre/g

    Fruits 726 147 89 962 2.09 180
    Legumes 3 180 141 734 4 055 1.19 19
    Meat 14 414 550 451 15 415 10.19 112

    * This table made by the author of the site Fruitarians.net (Lena), based on THE GREEN, BLUE AND GREY WATER FOOTPRINT OF FARM ANIMALS AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS, VOLUME 1: MAIN REPORT, M.M. MEKONNEN, A.Y. HOEKSTRA, DECEMBER 2010, VALUE OF WATER RESEARCH REPORT SERIES NO. 48, the link to PDF is provided on the article page.

    Study Conclusions 

    (UNESCO-IHE, Institute for Water Education, 2010)

    As a general picture we find that animal products have a larger water footprint per ton of product than crop products.

    ... The global average water footprint per ton of crop increases from sugar crops (roughly 200 m3 /ton) and vegetables (~300 m3 /ton) to pulses [legumes] (~4000 m3 /ton) and nuts (~9000 m3 /ton). For animal products, the water footprint increases from milk (~1000 m3 /ton) and egg (~3300 m3 /ton) to beef (~15400 m3 /ton).

    Also when viewed from a caloric standpoint, the water footprint of animal products is larger than for crop products. The average water footprint per calorie for beef is twenty times larger than for cereals and starchy roots.

    ... The water footprint per gram of protein for milk, eggs and chicken meat is about 1.5 times larger than for pulses. For beef, the water footprint per gram of protein is 6 times larger than for pulses.

    ... The general conclusion is that from a freshwater resource perspective, it is more efficient to obtain calories, protein and fat through crop products than animal products. 

    ... A vegetarian diet compared with the average current per capita food intake in the USA can reduce the water footprint of an individual by as much as 58%

  • Plant-Based Diet

    A plant-based diet is a diet of any animal (including humans) based on foods derived from plants, including vegetables, whole grains, legumes and fruits, but with few or no animal products

    "Plant-based diet" has been used to refer to the following diets:

    • Vegan diet - no food from animal sources.
      • Fruitarian  - consists primarily of fruit.
      • Raw vegan - food is uncooked and sometimes dehydrated.
    • Vegetarian - plant foods, may include eggs and dairy, but no meat.
    • Ovo-lacto vegetarian - includes dairy and eggs.
    • Ovo vegetarian - includes eggs but no dairy. 
    • Lacto vegetarian - includes dairy but no eggs.
    • Pescatarian - diet with eggs, dairy and seafood.
    • Semi-vegetarian - with occasional inclusion of meat.

  • Physicians and Plant-Based Diet

    Kaiser Permanente, the largest managed care organization in the United States:

    "Too often, physicians ignore the potential benefits of good nutrition and quickly prescribe medications instead of giving patients a chance to correct their disease through healthy eating and active living. Physicians should therefore consider recommending a plant-based diet to all their patients, especially those with high blood pressure, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or obesity."

  • USDA Tips for Vegetarians

    Tips for Vegetarians

    Vegetarian diets can meet all the recommendations for nutrients. The key is to consume a variety of foods and the right amount of foods to meet your calorie needs. Follow the food group recommendations for your age, sex, and activity level to get the right amount of food and the variety of foods needed for nutrient adequacy. Nutrients that vegetarians may need to focus on include protein, iron, calcium, zinc, and vitamin B12

  • Negative Effect of Vitamin Supplements

    It has become increasingly apparent in recent years that there are unintended consequences to taking vitamin supplements, and in fact there may be a net negative health effect. This is especially true for those who are healthy and don’t need vitamins, and for those who exceed the recommended dosages.

  • Fruits and Vegetables Can Save Lives and Money

    If Americans ate just one more serving of fruits or vegetables per day, this would save more than 30,000 lives and $5 billion in medical costs each year.

    If Americans were to follow current USDA recommendations for daily consumption of fruits and vegetables, those numbers would go up to more than 127,000 lives and $17 billion saved.

    The increased longevity that would result if Americans ate the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables is worth over $11 trillion.

  • Environmental Impact of Animal Food in Diet

    Based on a review of the most recent available scientific evidence, the new Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 (USDA DG) provide information and advice for choosing a healthy diet. To compare the environmental impacts of, respectively, omnivorous (OMN), lacto-ovo-vegetarian (LOV) and vegan (VEG) dietary patterns as suggested in the USDA DG, we analyzed the three patterns by Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology.

    The presence of animal food in the diet was the main determinant of environmental impact. The major impact always stemmed from land and water use. The second largest impact came from energy use. Emission of toxic inorganic compounds into the atmosphere was the third cause of impact. Climate change and acidification/eutrophication represented other substantial impacts.

  • Diets, Environmental Sustainability, and Health

    Diets link environmental and human health. Rising incomes and urbanization are driving a global dietary transition in which traditional diets are replaced by diets higher in refined sugars, refined fats, oils and meats. By 2050 these dietary trends, if unchecked, would be a major contributor to an estimated 80% increase in global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions from food production and to global land clearing. Moreover, these dietary shifts are greatly increasing the incidence of type II diabetes, coronary heart disease and other chronic non-communicable diseases that lower global life expectancies. 

    If widely adopted, alternative diets that offer substantial health benefits could reduce global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions, reduce species extinctions, and help prevent diet-related diseases. The implementation of dietary solutions to the tightly linked diet–environment–health trilemma is a global challenge of great environmental and public health importance.

  • 30 Million Trees Yearly Die for USA Books

    Use libraries and borrow books, buy used and e-books! Why? 


    Each year ~ 30 million trees are used to make books sold in US, many of which are sourced from endangered forests.
    U.S. book industry uses less than 10% recycled fiber for its paper (some publishers are better than others).

  • Fruitarian Pink Panther

    Fruitarian Pink Panther :) What would you do? 

George Berkeley

To be is to be perceived.

Water

Water is an essential nutrient - it is required in amounts that exceed the body's ability to produce it. All biochemical reactions occur in water. It fills the spaces in and between cells and helps form structures of large molecules such as protein and glycogen. 

Most foods contain water. The body can usually get 20% of its total water requirements from solid foods alone. The human body can last weeks without food, but only days without water. 

The digestion process also produces water as a byproduct and can provide around 10 per cent of the body’s water requirements.  

Water is a transparent and nearly colorless chemical substance. Its chemical formula is H2O, meaning that its molecule contains one oxygen and two hydrogen atoms

Water covers 71% of the Earth's surface. It is vital for all known forms of life. On Earth, 97% of the planet's crust water is found in seas and oceans, 1.7% in groundwater, 1.7% in glaciers and the ice caps. Only 2.5% of this water is freshwater, and 98.8% of that water is in ice (excepting ice in clouds) and groundwater. Less than 0.3% of all freshwater is in rivers, lakes.

Safe drinking water is essential to humans and other lifeforms even though it provides no calories or organic nutrients. ~One billion people still lack access to safe water. It was estimated that by 2025 more than half of the world population will be facing water-based vulnerability, and by 2030 water demand in some developing regions of the world will exceed supply by 50%.

Approximately 70% of the freshwater used by humans goes to agriculture. 

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