All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Maya, a journalist from Guardian, has asked me today about my opinion on distribution of fallen tomatoes:

Hi Lena

Thanks for getting back to me. I heard today that Waitrose are going to start selling tomatoes that have fallen off the vine ie ones that would have normally been wasted and rejected by supermarkets. Wondered what the fruitarian take would be? Is this a breakthrough in terms of fruit that has naturally fallen being sold nationwide.

Any thoughts?

Maya

____

Maya Wolfe-Robinson

The Guardian, Kings Place, 90 York Way, London N1 9GU

My response was:

Hi Maya, 

There are a few thought I had, reading your story, and I can offer them for your consideration.

If these fruits - tomatoes in this case - are gathered undamaged and clean, and there is therefore no additional concern for the health of the future consumers, then this practice could be very efficient for the businesses, and in general potentially good for the environment: less waste of natural resources, and as we know, nearly a half of all plant produce goes to waste in developed countries. 

The end-consumer might be happy too, because if fruit detaches from the plant by itself, it usually means that it is ripe, and fully tree-ripe fruits are often tastier and very likely more nutritious than those you can find in supermarkets (normally barely ripe). And if the product will be offered at a reduced price, than I hope more people will be interested in purchasing good quality fallen fruit. 

I know about similar practices, when people spread nets under trees to passively and softly gather gentle fruit (like mulberries, for example). Maybe it is possible to put a few of layers of dried leaves under tomato plants to protect the fruits from impact. 

During my life I often picked freshly fallen fruit and ate them after a short inspection :) 

Hope I was able to share with you my ideas in a well readable form, I guess I'll ask other fruitarians about it as well. 

Best,

Lena

Heraclitus

One cannot step twice in the same river.

Ethics and Aesthetics

Ethics - moral principles that govern behavior of a person or a group.

Ethics can refer to standards of right and wrong that prescribe what a human ought to do. Ethical standards include standards relating to rights (e.g. right to life, the right to freedom from injury).

Laws, and social norms, or feelings can differ from what is ethical. It is necessary for individuals to frequently examine own standards to ensure that they are reasonable. 

Ethics as moral philosophy involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct. Moral philosophy is related to the fields of moral psychology, descriptive ethics, and value theory.

As a branch of philosophy, ethics investigates the questions

  • "What is the best way for people to live?
  • "What actions are right or wrong in particular circumstances?"

Axiology is the philosophical study of value, collective term for ethics and aesthetics - philosophical fields that depend crucially on notions of worth. 

Aesthetics studies the concepts of "beauty" and "harmony." Aesthetics (esthetics) is a branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of art, beauty, and taste, creation and appreciation of beauty. It is more scientifically defined as the study of sensori-emotional values. More broadly, aesthetics is defined as "critical reflection on art, culture and nature."

Fruitarians.net Apple