All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

Vegan Skeptic Theo Summer on using tools of skepticism for GMO publications and studies:

Make sure you can identify the title of the study in question and the journal in which it was published. Don't ever take a blog post or a news story reporting on the results as an accurate representation.

If you can't read the entire study for yourself, use the reputation and the peer review process of the journal in which the study was published to judge how thoroughly the research may have been vetted prior to publication.

Look for follow-ups or critiques to the study that may have been published. See if the research has been reproduced anywhere else or if any similar studies have obtained similar results.

Make sure the study used appropriate controls and statistical methods. Ask yourself: “If an identical study had been run with all samples/groups/etc following the control procedure, would a statistically significant result be obtained the expected percentage of the time?”

The results of this Russian study provide no evidence that the differing diets these hamsters were fed played any role in the different outcomes observed. Keep in mind that the predominant use of genetically modified soy around the world is as animal feed. Had chickens or dairy cattle started producing fewer offspring as a result of the genetically modified soy in their feed it would have long ago been recognized by the farming community. Perhaps unfortunately for the animals bound to suffer in our factory farms, there is no such sterilizing effect of genetically modified soy in their diets.

Stanley Milgram

The disappearance of a sense of responsibility is the most far-reaching consequence of submission to authority.

Vitamin B3 Niacin

Vitamin B3, Niacin, nicotinic acid, helps to convert food into energy and is essential for healthy skin, blood cells, brain, and nervous system. It is one of 8 B vitamins. It is water-soluble, which means it is not stored in the body. It has 2 other forms, niacinamide (nicotinamide) and inositol hexanicotinate, which have different effects. 

Niacin occurs naturally in food and can also be made by your body from the amino acid tryptophan, with the help of B6

It is rare for anyone in the developed world to have a Vitamin B3 deficiency; alcoholism is the main cause of it in the US.

Recommended daily amount: 14 - 16 mg.

Example sources: whole grains, mushrooms, peanuts and other legumes. 

Fruits (100 g) : 

  1. Peaches or Apricots, dried - Niacin: 4 mg 
  2. Avocados, raw or Dates, medjool  - Niacin: 2 mg 

Seeds (100 g):

  1. Rice bran, crude - Niacin: 34 mg 
  2. Sesame flour - Niacin: 13 mg 
  3. Sunflower seed kernels, dried - Niacin: 8 mg 

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