All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

For many fruits, organic farming was nearly as productive as conventional farming (an average difference of just 3%). Cereals and veggies are where organic farming got trashed, with yields averaging 26 and 33% lower than conventional agriculture.

So the data suggests that switching to organic farming for specific crops like various fruits might be a smart move; the slight loss in productivity would be a small price to pay for the environmental benefit. Yet for other crops like corn, wheat and soybeans, organic farming would cut yields substantially. You could argue we grow more corn than we need, of course, because a lot of our corn goes to ethanol (thanks, Congress) and cattle (which is a crazy-inefficient use of corn, BTW — the ratio of corn consumed to beef produced is terrible). But the fact remains that organic farming is not the universal solution its advocates claim it to be. It looks like a good solution for a variety of specific crops, but we probably can’t do all our farming organically, because for many other crops it just doesn’t have anywhere near equivalent productivity.

Albert Schweitzer

The thinking man must oppose all cruel customs no matter how deeply rooted in tradition and surrounded by a halo. When we have a choice, we must avoid bringing torment and injury into the life of another, even the lowliest creature; to do so is to renounce our manhood and shoulder a guilt which nothing justifies. 

Choline Recommended Intake from Seeds and Fruits

Choline is an essential vitamin-like (vitamin B4) nutrient, synthesized in human body, but not sufficiently.

The recommended adequate intake (AI) of choline is set at 425 milligrams (mg)/day for women and 550 mg/day for men.

Choline deficiency causes muscle damage and abnormal deposition of fat in the liver, which results in a condition called nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Genetic predispositions and gender can influence individual variation in choline requirements.

Example Plant Fruitarian Sources of Choline

Seeds (including legumes and nuts), high in choline, milligrams per 100 g portion: 

  • Soybeans - 124 mg 
  • Lima beans - 97 mg 
  • Lentils - 96 mg
  • Peas (mature) - 96 mg
  • Flaxseeds - 79 mg 
  • Pistachio nuts - 71 mg 
  • Quinoa - 70 mg 
  • Pumpkin and squash seed kernels (pepitas) -  63 mg 
  • Cashew nuts - 61 mg 
  • Pine nuts - 56 mg 
  • Sunflower seed kernels - 55 mg 
  • Buckwheat - 54 mg 
  • Almonds - 52 mg 

Fruits, high in choline, milligrams per 100 g portion: 

  • Tomatoes, sun-dried - 105 mg 
  • Apples - 18 mg 
  • Figs - 16 mg 
  • Avocados - 14 mg 

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