All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

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Personal blog of Fruitarian Lena - fruitarian life in text and photographs.

Short after an unusually early run today I measured my heart rate, oxigen and stress levels, and have chosen my mood - happy. And then I have noticed I was apparently quite stressed :)

I found a very big papaya in a local growers store, around 13 inches long. And it was good too.

It seems to be a grapefruit season, so I've been buying them in big bags and making daily juice out of three large grapefruits. It takes a couple of minutes with this simple tool - I used to have one made of stainless steel - but the hard plastic works well too.
Grapefruit juice is so delicious, make some!


Today I went for a short run,  five kilometers, first time after many days of rain. My heart rate (61 bpm) and SpO2 measurements are good.

Heart rate 63 by the end of the day.

SpO2 is 100%.

SpO2 stands for peripheral capillary oxygen saturation, an estimate of the amount of oxygen in the blood.

It is the percentage of oxygenated haemoglobin (haemoglobin containing oxygen) compared to the total amount of haemoglobin in the blood.

In this third week of the year my health app gave me a report with this numbers:

Avg. carb intake 156.7 g
Avg. fat intake 37.8 g
Avg. protein intake 22.9 g

Avg. carb percentage 59.0%
Avg. fat percentage 32.0%
Avg. protein percentage 9.0%

I did forget to log a couple of days and missed a few fruits, but the average numbers should be close to real.  I ate more seeds this week than I do usually. It had been cold.

Winter berry choices: organic raspberries and wild blueberries.

Carl Sagan

A sharp distinction between humans and “animals” is essential if we are to bend them to our will, make them work for us, wear them, eat them–without any disquieting tinges of guilt or regret. It is unseemly of us, who often behave so unfeeling toward other animals, to contend that only humans can suffer. The behavior of other animals renders such pretensions specious. They are just too much like us.

Nutrient-Dense Food

Nutrient-dense foods are foods that have a lot of nutrients but relatively few calories.

Nutrient-dense foods and beverages contain: vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber, and other beneficial substances that may have positive health effects.

They are also naturally lean or low in saturated fat, and have little or no added saturated fat, sugars, refined starches, and sodium.

Examples of nutrient dense foods are: beans and peas, fresh fruit, unsalted nuts and seeds, vegetables, whole grains - most fruitarian foods are nutrient-dense.

Fruitarians.net Apple